New in Africa Renewal
Here are the latest stories and news from the January 2013 issue of Africa Renewal magazine.
5 December 2012

COVER STORY
China in the heart of Africa
Opportunities and pitfalls in a rapidly expanding relationship
Also in this issue

Stabilizing Somalia: a new chapter begins
As Somalia rises from the ashes of war, its new leaders brace up for huge challenges that lie ahead

What went wrong? Lessons from Malawi’s food crisis
Once a breadbasket, Malawi finds itself in food crisis. What went wrong? And why investment in agriculture is a smart thing to do

Politics of succession: coping when leaders die
When African leaders die in office, politics of succession can be heated. Why do some countries get it right and others wrong?

Reconstructive surgery brings hope to survivors of genital cutting
New advances in reconstructive surgery help survivors of female genital mutilation live normal lives

Ghana’s ‘new path’ for handling oil revenue
Determined that its newly discovered oil will not be a curse, Ghana puts in place policies for efficient and transparent management of natural resources

‘Ensure that everyone benefits from economic gains’
Exclusive Interview with Maged Abdelaziz, UN special adviser on Africa

After Africa’s wars, a ‘new day’ for building peace
Exclusive interview with Judy Cheng-Hopkins, head of Peacebuilding Support

Africa Wired: Texting your way to health
UN launches ‘mHealth’ initiative to fight diseases

Book Review: Women and Leadership in West Africa
Filomina Chioma Steady argues that female leadership can “humanize the state”

New in Africa Renewal

Here are the latest stories and news from the January 2013 issue of Africa Renewal magazine.

5 December 2012

COVER STORY

China in the heart of Africa

Opportunities and pitfalls in a rapidly expanding relationship

Also in this issue

Stabilizing Somalia: a new chapter begins

As Somalia rises from the ashes of war, its new leaders brace up for huge challenges that lie ahead

What went wrong? Lessons from Malawi’s food crisis

Once a breadbasket, Malawi finds itself in food crisis. What went wrong? And why investment in agriculture is a smart thing to do

Politics of succession: coping when leaders die

When African leaders die in office, politics of succession can be heated. Why do some countries get it right and others wrong?

Reconstructive surgery brings hope to survivors of genital cutting

New advances in reconstructive surgery help survivors of female genital mutilation live normal lives

Ghana’s ‘new path’ for handling oil revenue

Determined that its newly discovered oil will not be a curse, Ghana puts in place policies for efficient and transparent management of natural resources

‘Ensure that everyone benefits from economic gains’

Exclusive Interview with Maged Abdelaziz, UN special adviser on Africa

After Africa’s wars, a ‘new day’ for building peace

Exclusive interview with Judy Cheng-Hopkins, head of Peacebuilding Support

Africa Wired: Texting your way to health

UN launches ‘mHealth’ initiative to fight diseases

Book Review: Women and Leadership in West Africa

Filomina Chioma Steady argues that female leadership can “humanize the state”

Message from the CEO

Greetings! Welcome to the first edition of the new NEPAD Newsletter, INDABA. Indaba is a word in the Bantu dialect, which is spoken in most parts of east, central and southern Africa. It means news or fresh information, and also refers to a council at which indigenous people meet to discuss important issues. With this in mind, our monthly newsletter aims to bring the latest NEPAD news, stories and developments to our readers. You will find this edition enlightening, informative and relevant. In this publication, we focus on the 19th African Union Summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, as well as highlight NEPAD’s key engagements prior to the Summit. We also showcase the impact of our programmes and share some rich traditional aspects of Africa.
I trust that you will find INDABA useful and will enjoy reading it. Kind regards, Dr Ibrahim Assane Mayaki 
NEPAD Indaba: a monthly newsletter of the NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency In this issue Postcard from Addis by Maureen Nkandu …. read full story»> NEPAD @ AU Summit in Pictures …. read full story»> CEO’s quick bits on the AU Summit …. read full story»> Call for Private-Public sector to boost Africa’s Infrastructure …. read full story»> NEPAD at Rio+20 …. read full story»> Tribute to Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, new AUC Chairperson …. read full story»> If you were President for a day, what would you tell fellow heads of state at the Summit? …. read full story»>Mayaki acknowledges UNECA’s support for NEPAD Agency …. read full story»>NEPAD/ECOWAS agreement to empower rural women …. read full story»>Quick facts on NEPAD …. read full story»>Youth on development …. read full story»>Curiozo… on the AU Summit …. read full story»>
Message from the CEO


ceo

Greetings!
Welcome to the first edition of the new NEPAD Newsletter, INDABA.

Indaba is a word in the Bantu dialect, which is spoken in most parts of east, central and southern Africa. It means news or fresh information, and also refers to a council at which indigenous people meet to discuss important issues.

With this in mind, our monthly newsletter aims to bring the latest NEPAD news, stories and developments to our readers.

You will find this edition enlightening, informative and relevant. In this publication, we focus on the 19th African Union Summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, as well as highlight NEPAD’s key engagements prior to the Summit. We also showcase the impact of our programmes and share some rich traditional aspects of Africa.

I trust that you will find INDABA useful and will enjoy reading it.

Kind regards,
Dr Ibrahim Assane Mayaki 

NEPAD Indaba: a monthly newsletter of the NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency

In this issue

Postcard from Addis by Maureen Nkandu …. read full story»>
NEPAD @ AU Summit in Pictures …. read full story»>
CEO’s quick bits on the AU Summit …. read full story»>
Call for Private-Public sector to boost Africa’s Infrastructure …. read full story»>
NEPAD at Rio+20 …. read full story»>
Tribute to Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, new AUC Chairperson …. read full story»>
If you were President for a day, what would you tell fellow heads of state at the Summit? …. read full story»>
Mayaki acknowledges UNECA’s support for NEPAD Agency …. read full story»>
NEPAD/ECOWAS agreement to empower rural women …. read full story»>
Quick facts on NEPAD …. read full story»>
Youth on development …. read full story»>
Curiozo… on the AU Summit …. read full story»>

New in Africa Renewal
Latest stories and news from the August issue of Africa Renewal magazine.
25 July 2012

SPECIAL FEATURE
African economies capture world attention
Africa’s economic indicators are remarkably positive, capturing the world’s attention

Harnessing African stock exchanges
How the right policies can unleash the power of African stock exchanges

Steady growth in tourism in Africa
Innovation and better infrastructure can draw more visitors

New cash for expanding business
Private equity reaches out to capital-hungry African companies

Mining for development
New calls for contracts to benefit communities
Also in this issue

Rio summit keeps hopes alive
Some gains, plus commitments to future sustainable development talks

Eye on the prize
African schools focus on attaining universal primary education

Mali’s Timbuktu suffers rebel fury
Terror unleashed on the revered Timbuktu mausoleums

Is democracy in West Africa under threat?
Recent coups in Mali and Guinea-Bissau raise eyebrows

Building peace from the ground up
Key roles for civil society in keeping violence at bay

Africa Wired: The BlackBerry sensation in Africa continues
Smartphone’s secret to success is affordability

Book Review: War and Conflict in Africa
A comprehensive overview of the broad patterns of warfare in Africa, and a few possible lessons for achieving peace

New in Africa Renewal

Latest stories and news from the August issue of Africa Renewal magazine.

25 July 2012

SPECIAL FEATURE

African economies capture world attention

Africa’s economic indicators are remarkably positive, capturing the world’s attention

Harnessing African stock exchanges

How the right policies can unleash the power of African stock exchanges

Steady growth in tourism in Africa

Innovation and better infrastructure can draw more visitors

New cash for expanding business

Private equity reaches out to capital-hungry African companies

Mining for development

New calls for contracts to benefit communities

Also in this issue

Rio summit keeps hopes alive

Some gains, plus commitments to future sustainable development talks

Eye on the prize

African schools focus on attaining universal primary education

Mali’s Timbuktu suffers rebel fury

Terror unleashed on the revered Timbuktu mausoleums

Is democracy in West Africa under threat?

Recent coups in Mali and Guinea-Bissau raise eyebrows

Building peace from the ground up

Key roles for civil society in keeping violence at bay

Africa Wired: The BlackBerry sensation in Africa continues

Smartphone’s secret to success is affordability

Book Review: War and Conflict in Africa

A comprehensive overview of the broad patterns of warfare in Africa, and a few possible lessons for achieving peace

La sécurité énergétique est un élément clé pour la viabilité économique d’une société moderne qui fonctionne. L’Afrique est un important fournisseur de combustibles fossiles cependant la tendance mondiale à adopter des combustibles au carbone neutres pour contribuer aux mesures de lutte contre le changement climatique donne également à l’Afrique australe l’opportunité de tirer parti de ses grandes sources de biomasse et de la capacité de production industrielle pour développer et déployer les technologies bioénergétiques dans les secteurs clés des biocarburants, de la bioénergie et des énergies renouvelables. Cela devrait être une opportunité pour l’Afrique dans son ensemble de concurrencer favorablement les régions les plus avancées économiquement et, ce faisant, créer de nouvelles technologies, des emplois et des revenus.
Le NEPAD organise un Atelier sur l’Investissement dans la Bioénergie à Dakar , Sénégal les 30 et 31 Août 2012 pour aider à tirer profit des opportunités d’investissement dans la bioénergie en Afrique de l’Ouest, surtout en sensibilisant et en stimulant un partenariat public-privé fécond et l’adoption d’un mécanisme de financement novateur. L’objectif global est d’encourager l’investissement dans la bioénergie par le secteur privé africain pour améliorer la sécurité énergétique, accroitre la production et l’utilisation de l’énergie propre au niveau local, augmenter la création d’emplois, faciliter le transfert de technologie et atténuer l’impact environnemental des déchets industriels. L’atelier devrait identifier et chercher à lever les obstacles d’investissement du secteur privé dans la bioénergie.
Les autorités gouvernementales, le secteur privé, les bailleurs de fonds et les fournisseurs des technologies participeront à cet atelier qui sera un cadre unique pour promouvoir les demandes et les investissements dans la bioénergie au niveau de la sous-région en présentant les technologies, l’expertise et les sources de financement éligibles pour un tel investissement.
http://www.bioenergyinvestment-westafrica.com/fr/component/content/article/103-nepad-bioenergy-investment-symposium-west-africa-region.html

La sécurité énergétique est un élément clé pour la viabilité économique d’une société moderne qui fonctionne. L’Afrique est un important fournisseur de combustibles fossiles cependant la tendance mondiale à adopter des combustibles au carbone neutres pour contribuer aux mesures de lutte contre le changement climatique donne également à l’Afrique australe l’opportunité de tirer parti de ses grandes sources de biomasse et de la capacité de production industrielle pour développer et déployer les technologies bioénergétiques dans les secteurs clés des biocarburants, de la bioénergie et des énergies renouvelables. Cela devrait être une opportunité pour l’Afrique dans son ensemble de concurrencer favorablement les régions les plus avancées économiquement et, ce faisant, créer de nouvelles technologies, des emplois et des revenus.

Le NEPAD organise un Atelier sur l’Investissement dans la Bioénergie à Dakar , Sénégal les 30 et 31 Août 2012 pour aider à tirer profit des opportunités d’investissement dans la bioénergie en Afrique de l’Ouest, surtout en sensibilisant et en stimulant un partenariat public-privé fécond et l’adoption d’un mécanisme de financement novateur. L’objectif global est d’encourager l’investissement dans la bioénergie par le secteur privé africain pour améliorer la sécurité énergétique, accroitre la production et l’utilisation de l’énergie propre au niveau local, augmenter la création d’emplois, faciliter le transfert de technologie et atténuer l’impact environnemental des déchets industriels. L’atelier devrait identifier et chercher à lever les obstacles d’investissement du secteur privé dans la bioénergie.

Les autorités gouvernementales, le secteur privé, les bailleurs de fonds et les fournisseurs des technologies participeront à cet atelier qui sera un cadre unique pour promouvoir les demandes et les investissements dans la bioénergie au niveau de la sous-région en présentant les technologies, l’expertise et les sources de financement éligibles pour un tel investissement.

http://www.bioenergyinvestment-westafrica.com/fr/component/content/article/103-nepad-bioenergy-investment-symposium-west-africa-region.html

RCM Africa Newsletter first edition, Vol 1 Issue1, July - Sep 2012 
It is with great pleasure that we present the inaugural edition of the Regional Coordination Mechanism (RCM-Africa) quarterly newsletter. We hope that this will be the beginning of a series of constructive and fruitful exchanges that will bring Clusters closer together and be a forum to share information, ideas, good practices and concerns.
We would like to thank everyone who provided inputs and if there are any issues you would like to see in future editions of this newsletter please let us know.
We hope you enjoy this newsletter.
Your messages can be sent to rcmafrica@uneca.org

RCM Africa Newsletter first edition, Vol 1 Issue1, July - Sep 2012 

It is with great pleasure that we present the inaugural edition of the Regional Coordination Mechanism (RCM-Africa) quarterly newsletter. We hope that this will be the beginning of a series of constructive and fruitful exchanges that will bring Clusters closer together and be a forum to share information, ideas, good practices and concerns.

We would like to thank everyone who provided inputs and if there are any issues you would like to see in future editions of this newsletter please let us know.

We hope you enjoy this newsletter.

Your messages can be sent to rcmafrica@uneca.org

Extract of Mrs. Estherine Fotabong, the NEPAD Agency Head of Directorate for Programme Implementation and Coordination, participation to the High-Level side event of OECD on “Green Growth and Developing Countries” held at Rio+20 on 22 June 2012

AfRio

more information on OECD work on Green Growth @oecd

Rio+20

Focus On:
The Bloomberg New Energy Finance Climatescope initiative
On the 19th of June 2012, the “data folks” did well again: Bloomberg New Energy Finance BNEF disclosed Climatescope its new annual ranking and online tool that profiles the “investment climate for climate investment” in Latin America and the Caribbean LAC. The official launch of Climatescope established Brazil, Nicaragua and Panama as the top 3 LAC countries assessing their capability in building a green economy.
 The initiative, jointly developed with MIF (Multilateral Investment Fund – member of Inter-American Development Bank Group), is aimed at drawing up a business index in LAC, through 30 indicators analyse. It highlights the importance of green policies that give green investors stability and predictability, encouraging private investment of green capital flows.
The demo made during the event showed an “extraordinary useful tool” to make the ranking of 26 countries according to 4 interrelated parameters (enabling framework; clean energy investment and climate financing; low-carbon business and clean energy value; green house gas management activities) supported by the various indicators developed by BNEF. As a result, all actors from policy makers to academics via entrepreneurs or users of clean energy can use the friendly interface offered by Climatescope and acquaint themselves with the inspiring case studies. Climatescope is available free of charge on the Internet at the following link: http://climatescope.fomin.org
Michael Liebreich, BNEF CEO, recalled that “in 2011 more than $260 billion have been invested in clean energy worldwide without including the large scale hydro projects”, out of the global total 10% went to Latin America, which is a continent richly endowed in natural capital. This report will contribute to help all stakeholders to find sustainable energy solutions in response to development issues. Will Africa be the next scoped continent? I hope so. 
Organized in the Gavea Golf Club in Rio de Janeiro, the presentation has been followed by a reception where the participants could play with the freshly released Climatescope tool on terminals put at their disposal.
Sarah LawanFrom the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development UNCSD Rio+20

Rio+20

afRio

Focus On:

The Bloomberg New Energy Finance Climatescope initiative

On the 19th of June 2012, the “data folks” did well again: Bloomberg New Energy Finance BNEF disclosed Climatescope its new annual ranking and online tool that profiles the “investment climate for climate investment” in Latin America and the Caribbean LAC. The official launch of Climatescope established Brazil, Nicaragua and Panama as the top 3 LAC countries assessing their capability in building a green economy.

The initiative, jointly developed with MIF (Multilateral Investment Fund – member of Inter-American Development Bank Group), is aimed at drawing up a business index in LAC, through 30 indicators analyse. It highlights the importance of green policies that give green investors stability and predictability, encouraging private investment of green capital flows.

The demo made during the event showed an “extraordinary useful tool” to make the ranking of 26 countries according to 4 interrelated parameters (enabling framework; clean energy investment and climate financing; low-carbon business and clean energy value; green house gas management activities) supported by the various indicators developed by BNEF. As a result, all actors from policy makers to academics via entrepreneurs or users of clean energy can use the friendly interface offered by Climatescope and acquaint themselves with the inspiring case studies. Climatescope is available free of charge on the Internet at the following link: http://climatescope.fomin.org

Michael Liebreich, BNEF CEO, recalled that “in 2011 more than $260 billion have been invested in clean energy worldwide without including the large scale hydro projects”, out of the global total 10% went to Latin America, which is a continent richly endowed in natural capital. This report will contribute to help all stakeholders to find sustainable energy solutions in response to development issues. Will Africa be the next scoped continent? I hope so. 

Organized in the Gavea Golf Club in Rio de Janeiro, the presentation has been followed by a reception where the participants could play with the freshly released Climatescope tool on terminals put at their disposal.

Sarah Lawan
From the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development UNCSD Rio+20

Development Banks commit to fostering sustainable development

06/19/2012
• IDFC, a club that unites 19 institutions from around the world, released a document after a meeting at the BNDES’ headquarters At a meeting held on June 19 at the headquarters of the BNDES, executives from development banks and funding agencies that comprise the International Development Finance Club (IDFC) issued a statement containing the club’s principles for fostering sustainable development. In the document, members of the group, which includes 19 institutions from all continents, committed to collaborating with knowledge, resources and tools to facilitate and accelerate the transition process to a more sustainable, social and ecological economy. Among the commitments made to help economic agents adopt new levels in their environmental practices, there is support for sustainable investments in the infrastructure area and the development of new financial instruments based on sustainability and innovation. The full document can be accessed in Portuguese (http://migre.me/9yNcM) and English (http://migre.me/9yNdD). “Development banks are a very powerful tool for inclusive and sustainable development,” said the BNDES’ president, Luciano Coutinho. He also recalled the importance of the “stabilizing role” of such institutions in times of crisis like the present. The President of IDFC and German development bank KfW, Ulrich Schroeder, highlighted the experience of members of the club in “combining public and private funds in financing development”. Renewable energy, public transport, water and sanitation are among the sectors of infrastructure to be strengthened. The IDFC’s other commitment is to help reduce incentives to non-sustainable production. In the afternoon, the executives of the IDFC attended the international seminar on Financing the Green Economy and the Sustainable Development, held at the BNDES’ headquarters.The conference, which marked the 60th anniversary of the Bank, allowed the exchange of experiences on sustainability on the eve of the meeting of Heads of State at Rio+20.
@bndes

Development Banks commit to fostering sustainable development

06/19/2012

• IDFC, a club that unites 19 institutions from around the world, released a document after a meeting at the BNDES’ headquarters 

At a meeting held on June 19 at the headquarters of the BNDES, executives from development banks and funding agencies that comprise the International Development Finance Club (IDFC) issued a statement containing the club’s principles for fostering sustainable development. 

In the document, members of the group, which includes 19 institutions from all continents, committed to collaborating with knowledge, resources and tools to facilitate and accelerate the transition process to a more sustainable, social and ecological economy. 

Among the commitments made to help economic agents adopt new levels in their environmental practices, there is support for sustainable investments in the infrastructure area and the development of new financial instruments based on sustainability and innovation. The full document can be accessed in Portuguese (http://migre.me/9yNcM) and English (http://migre.me/9yNdD). 

“Development banks are a very powerful tool for inclusive and sustainable development,” said the BNDES’ president, Luciano Coutinho. He also recalled the importance of the “stabilizing role” of such institutions in times of crisis like the present. 

The President of IDFC and German development bank KfW, Ulrich Schroeder, highlighted the experience of members of the club in “combining public and private funds in financing development”. 

Renewable energy, public transport, water and sanitation are among the sectors of infrastructure to be strengthened. The IDFC’s other commitment is to help reduce incentives to non-sustainable production. 

In the afternoon, the executives of the IDFC attended the international seminar on Financing the Green Economy and the Sustainable Development, held at the BNDES’ headquarters.

The conference, which marked the 60th anniversary of the Bank, allowed the exchange of experiences on sustainability on the eve of the meeting of Heads of State at Rio+20.

@bndes

Rio+20

Focus On:
The UNU “twin institute” concept
While I was attending the United Nations University UNU side-event entitled “Global Governance Mechanisms for Boosting Green Innovation” today, the 15th of June 2012, at Riocentro, I was stricken by the presentation made by Dr. Timothy Afful-Koomson, Environmental Policy Fellow at the United Nations University Institute for Natural Resources in Africa (UNU-INRA) based in Accra, Ghana. As the UNU-INRA Institute will deliver its first educational programme in September 2013 under the form of a joint (with UNU-WIDER) PhD in Development Economics, it highlights the march of the “twin institutes” concept:
A twin can be defined as a UNU institute with all the privileges and characteristics of UNU. The main idea that underlies the implementation of a Twin is building true partnerships in research and education and working against brain-drain. Through its Africa Strategy, UNU plays a strategic role in Africa as a facilitator of dialogue, a capacity builder, a provider of postgraduate training, and a promoter of innovation. […] UNU activities in and on Africa aim to foster knowledge creation with a strong emphasis on home-grown and participatory “made-to-fit” solutions.
By conducting research together, the “twin institutes” will aim at fostering knowledge exchanges between “developed countries” and “developing and transitional countries” in an unprecedented way. This genuine partnership will develop better understanding among academics from both sides. As a result, their expertise will be more accurate and enable to tackle the challenges that Africa is facing. Not only the concept allows technology dissemination but also it builds capacity on the ground.
Coming next is the joint curriculum focusing on “sustainable management of resources, such as water, soil, and waste” that will be undertaken by UNU-FLORES and its “twin institute” in Maputo, Mozambique. To be continued…
Finally it is a good occasion to recall the UNU-ViE Priority Africa Initiative’s objective of collaboratively gathering knowledge for the sake of African development. The UNU-ViE team produced an impressive African mapping of their projects entitled “Spotlight on Africa”.
http://inra.unu.edu/
http://vie.unu.edu/article/read/priority-africa
http://vie.unu.edu/file/get/9214
Sarah Lawan
From the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development UNCSD Rio+20

Rio+20

AfRio

Focus On:

The UNU “twin institute” concept

While I was attending the United Nations University UNU side-event entitled “Global Governance Mechanisms for Boosting Green Innovation” today, the 15th of June 2012, at Riocentro, I was stricken by the presentation made by Dr. Timothy Afful-Koomson, Environmental Policy Fellow at the United Nations University Institute for Natural Resources in Africa (UNU-INRA) based in Accra, Ghana. As the UNU-INRA Institute will deliver its first educational programme in September 2013 under the form of a joint (with UNU-WIDER) PhD in Development Economics, it highlights the march of the “twin institutes” concept:

A twin can be defined as a UNU institute with all the privileges and characteristics of UNU. The main idea that underlies the implementation of a Twin is building true partnerships in research and education and working against brain-drain. Through its Africa Strategy, UNU plays a strategic role in Africa as a facilitator of dialogue, a capacity builder, a provider of postgraduate training, and a promoter of innovation. […] UNU activities in and on Africa aim to foster knowledge creation with a strong emphasis on home-grown and participatory “made-to-fit” solutions.

By conducting research together, the “twin institutes” will aim at fostering knowledge exchanges between “developed countries” and “developing and transitional countries” in an unprecedented way. This genuine partnership will develop better understanding among academics from both sides. As a result, their expertise will be more accurate and enable to tackle the challenges that Africa is facing. Not only the concept allows technology dissemination but also it builds capacity on the ground.

Coming next is the joint curriculum focusing on “sustainable management of resources, such as water, soil, and waste” that will be undertaken by UNU-FLORES and its “twin institute” in Maputo, Mozambique. To be continued…

Finally it is a good occasion to recall the UNU-ViE Priority Africa Initiative’s objective of collaboratively gathering knowledge for the sake of African development. The UNU-ViE team produced an impressive African mapping of their projects entitled “Spotlight on Africa”.

http://inra.unu.edu/

http://vie.unu.edu/article/read/priority-africa

http://vie.unu.edu/file/get/9214

Sarah Lawan

From the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development UNCSD Rio+20

Africa Human Development Report 2012: Towards a Food Secure Future
Published on 15 May 2012
Document Summary
The 2012 Human Development Report for Africa explores why dehumanizing hunger remains pervasive in the region, despite abundant agricultural resources, a favorable growing climate, and rapid economic growth rates. It also emphasizes that food security – the ability to consistently acquire enough calories and nutrients for a healthy and productive life - is essential for human development.  
To boost food security, it argues for action in four interrelated areas: agricultural productivity, nutrition, access to food, and empowerment of the rural poor. It asserts that increasing agricultural productivity in sustainable ways can bolster food production and economic opportunities, thereby improving food availability and increasing purchasing power. Effective nutrition policies can create conditions for the proper use and absorption of calories and nutrients. Finally, empowering the rural poor - especially women - and harnessing the power of information, innovation, and markets can promote equitable allocation of food and resources within families and across communities.
Highlights
Sub-Saharan Africa’s population, 856 million in 2010, is projected to exceed 2 billion shortly after 2050.
More than one in four Africans - close to 218 million people - is undernourished.
Two major biases – towards towns rather than rural areas and towards men, not women – have been principal factors in explaining Africa’s food insecurity.
African governments spend between 5-10% of their budgets on agriculture, well below the 20% average that Asian governments devoted to the sector during the green revolution there.
Women are significant food producers, but their control of land in sub-Saharan Africa is less than in any other region.
@undp

Africa Human Development Report 2012: Towards a Food Secure Future

Published on 15 May 2012

Document Summary

The 2012 Human Development Report for Africa explores why dehumanizing hunger remains pervasive in the region, despite abundant agricultural resources, a favorable growing climate, and rapid economic growth rates. It also emphasizes that food security – the ability to consistently acquire enough calories and nutrients for a healthy and productive life - is essential for human development.  

To boost food security, it argues for action in four interrelated areas: agricultural productivity, nutrition, access to food, and empowerment of the rural poor. It asserts that increasing agricultural productivity in sustainable ways can bolster food production and economic opportunities, thereby improving food availability and increasing purchasing power. Effective nutrition policies can create conditions for the proper use and absorption of calories and nutrients. Finally, empowering the rural poor - especially women - and harnessing the power of information, innovation, and markets can promote equitable allocation of food and resources within families and across communities.

Highlights

  • Sub-Saharan Africa’s population, 856 million in 2010, is projected to exceed 2 billion shortly after 2050.
  • More than one in four Africans - close to 218 million people - is undernourished.
  • Two major biases – towards towns rather than rural areas and towards men, not women – have been principal factors in explaining Africa’s food insecurity.
  • African governments spend between 5-10% of their budgets on agriculture, well below the 20% average that Asian governments devoted to the sector during the green revolution there.
  • Women are significant food producers, but their control of land in sub-Saharan Africa is less than in any other region.

@undp

4th Africa Water Week
The African Water Week represents a political commitment at the highest level where governments, regional institutions, international partners, the private sector, the scientific community, civil society, and the media from all over the world, and in particular Africa, meet to discuss and collectively seek solutions to Africa’s water and sanitation challenges.  It is held annually in keeping with the decision of the African Ministers Council on Water to institutionalize the Africa Water Week (AWW) in order to build momentum on achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) water and sanitation targets by 2015, and the 2025 Africa Water Vision. This is in line with AMCOW’s belief that adequate and equitable access to water and sanitation makes a critical contribution to Africa’s progress towards sustainable development.
@aww

4th Africa Water Week

The African Water Week represents a political commitment at the highest level where governments, regional institutions, international partners, the private sector, the scientific community, civil society, and the media from all over the world, and in particular Africa, meet to discuss and collectively seek solutions to Africa’s water and sanitation challenges.  It is held annually in keeping with the decision of the African Ministers Council on Water to institutionalize the Africa Water Week (AWW) in order to build momentum on achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) water and sanitation targets by 2015, and the 2025 Africa Water Vision. This is in line with AMCOW’s belief that adequate and equitable access to water and sanitation makes a critical contribution to Africa’s progress towards sustainable development.

@aww