4th Africa Water Week
The African Water Week represents a political commitment at the highest level where governments, regional institutions, international partners, the private sector, the scientific community, civil society, and the media from all over the world, and in particular Africa, meet to discuss and collectively seek solutions to Africa’s water and sanitation challenges.  It is held annually in keeping with the decision of the African Ministers Council on Water to institutionalize the Africa Water Week (AWW) in order to build momentum on achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) water and sanitation targets by 2015, and the 2025 Africa Water Vision. This is in line with AMCOW’s belief that adequate and equitable access to water and sanitation makes a critical contribution to Africa’s progress towards sustainable development.
@aww

4th Africa Water Week

The African Water Week represents a political commitment at the highest level where governments, regional institutions, international partners, the private sector, the scientific community, civil society, and the media from all over the world, and in particular Africa, meet to discuss and collectively seek solutions to Africa’s water and sanitation challenges.  It is held annually in keeping with the decision of the African Ministers Council on Water to institutionalize the Africa Water Week (AWW) in order to build momentum on achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) water and sanitation targets by 2015, and the 2025 Africa Water Vision. This is in line with AMCOW’s belief that adequate and equitable access to water and sanitation makes a critical contribution to Africa’s progress towards sustainable development.

@aww

UN SECRETARY-GENERAL BRIEFS MEMBER STATES ON ‘SUSTAINABLE ENERGY FOR ALL’ INITIATIVE, NAMES LEADERS OF HIGH-LEVEL ACTION GROUP

This is the text of remarks by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to General Assembly Members in New York today at a briefing on “Sustainable Energy for All”:

Energy is central to everything we do, from powering our economies to empowering women, from generating jobs to strengthening security.  It cuts across all sectors of government and lies at the heart of a country’s core interests.

Yesterday, we marked the global population topping 7 billion people.  One person in five lacks access to modern energy; 3 billion people rely on wood, coal, charcoal or dung for cooking and heating.  They are energy-poor.  And energy poverty translates into grinding, dehumanizing poverty.  Now more than ever, the world needs to ensure that the benefits of sustainable modern energy are available to all.

Energy poverty is a threat to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.  It holds back economic growth and job creation.  At the same time, we must move very rapidly toward a clean energy economy to prevent the dangerous warming of our planet.  We need to catalyse low-carbon economic opportunity across the globe, particularly in developing countries where needs are greatest.

Last year, the General Assembly passed a resolution declaring 2012 the International Year of Sustainable Energy for All.  This September, I launched my “Sustainable Energy for All” initiative.  It contributes to the Year by mobilizing action by all key stakeholders – governments, the private sector and civil society.

Today I am releasing my vision statement on sustainable energy for all.  I have set three objectives, all to be achieved by 2030.  First:  ensure universal access to modern energy services.  Second:  double the rate of improvement of energy efficiency.  Third:  double the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix.

The world is hungry for solutions to global challenges.  This initiative provides them on multiple levels.  Taken in combination, these objectives will enhance equity, revitalize the global economy, and help protect the ecosystems that sustain us.  I call these the three Es:  equity, economy and ecosystems.  These are one and the same agenda:  the sustainable development agenda.  We cannot make lasting progress in one without progress on all.

I have heard strong support for “Sustainable Energy for All” across the spectrum.  The up-front costs are not small.  But the long-term returns can be massive.  Sustainable energy for all offers powerful benefits – for stimulating economic growth, reducing poverty, cleaner air, reduced mortality and reduced risk of dangerous climate change.

What is standing between us and these achievements?  Political will — and resources both private and public.

The “Sustainable Energy for All” initiative is gathering the broad-based support we need — from developed countries, emerging economies, developing countries, the private sector and civil society.  Today I am pleased to announce the members of the High-Level Group on Sustainable Energy for All.  The Group is co-chaired by Kandeh Yumkella, the Chair of United Nations Energy and Executive Director of United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), and Charles Holliday, Chairman of Bank of America.  The “Sustainable Energy for All” Group includes more than 30 distinguished global leaders from around the world – business, finance, governments, civil society.  The Group will develop an action agenda in support of the 2030 goal.  It will mobilize a broad range of stakeholders who can catalyse commitments and form partnerships that can be launched at Rio+20.

I urge you to lend your support.  Together we can make sustainable energy for all a catalyst for lasting economic growth that benefits all people, gives opportunity to the poor and protects the planet.

@un

NEPAD@10 Press Release

UN and African officials mark 10 years of the continent’s development plan 

New York,  3 October 2011 – As the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), the blueprint for the continent’s development, commemorates its tenth anniversary, United Nations and African officials gather in New York to reflect on its achievements and debate its future course. 

A series of high-level meetings and events designed to foster debates and generate  suggestions for further improvements are slated to take place from 6 to 12 October in New York, both at the UN headquarters and elsewhere in the city. “All these are opportunities for us to look back at the role of NEPAD  and the remarkable progress Africa has made over the past ten years,” said UN Under Secretary-General and Special Adviser for Africa, Mr. Cheikh Sidi Diarra. 

The events will kick off on 7 October with a panel discussion at the UN, which will ponder the links between NEPAD and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Other events include briefings to UN member states, a commemorative public lecture at Columbia University, and press briefings by Ibrahim Assane Mayaki, the Chief Executive Officer of the NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency (NPCA), and other officials.

Shortly after its adoption by African leader ten years ago, the NEPAD plan became the main UN vehicle in support  of  Africa. Over the past decade, NEPAD has  promoted bold and innovative approaches in various sectors, including agriculture, new technologies and governance. “Our initiatives are progressively bearing fruits on the grounds and we expect the plan’s impact to be stronger in coming years,” affirms Mr. Mayaki. “Already, it has changed the perception people have of Africa,” he adds.

In  February 2010, NEPAD was officially incorporated into the African Union (AU) formal structures with the creation of the NPCA.

For Africa as a whole, the past ten years have been marked by significant progress: economic growth accelerated during most of the decade across the continent and democratically elected regimes became more common. Yet, endemic poverty and high unemployment rates persist. “Meeting here, 10 years after the plan was adopted, is also an opportunity to take a closer look at the challenges that remains for NEPAD and for the continent,” concludes Mr. Diarra.

For more information, please contact
UN-DPI: André-Michel Essoungou, essoungou@un.org, 1-917-367-9995
UN-OSAA: François Charlier, charlier@un.org, 1-212-963-0359
NEPAD Agency: Andrew Kanyegirire, andrewk@nepad.org, +27 83 704 4506
AU/NEPAD: Sarah Lawan, sarah.lawan@gmail.com, +13475307926

Visit UN/NEPAD@10 website at http://www.nepad.org/ and http://www.un.org/africarenewal