Message from the CEO

Greetings! Welcome to the first edition of the new NEPAD Newsletter, INDABA. Indaba is a word in the Bantu dialect, which is spoken in most parts of east, central and southern Africa. It means news or fresh information, and also refers to a council at which indigenous people meet to discuss important issues. With this in mind, our monthly newsletter aims to bring the latest NEPAD news, stories and developments to our readers. You will find this edition enlightening, informative and relevant. In this publication, we focus on the 19th African Union Summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, as well as highlight NEPAD’s key engagements prior to the Summit. We also showcase the impact of our programmes and share some rich traditional aspects of Africa.
I trust that you will find INDABA useful and will enjoy reading it. Kind regards, Dr Ibrahim Assane Mayaki 
NEPAD Indaba: a monthly newsletter of the NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency In this issue Postcard from Addis by Maureen Nkandu …. read full story»> NEPAD @ AU Summit in Pictures …. read full story»> CEO’s quick bits on the AU Summit …. read full story»> Call for Private-Public sector to boost Africa’s Infrastructure …. read full story»> NEPAD at Rio+20 …. read full story»> Tribute to Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, new AUC Chairperson …. read full story»> If you were President for a day, what would you tell fellow heads of state at the Summit? …. read full story»>Mayaki acknowledges UNECA’s support for NEPAD Agency …. read full story»>NEPAD/ECOWAS agreement to empower rural women …. read full story»>Quick facts on NEPAD …. read full story»>Youth on development …. read full story»>Curiozo… on the AU Summit …. read full story»>
Message from the CEO


ceo

Greetings!
Welcome to the first edition of the new NEPAD Newsletter, INDABA.

Indaba is a word in the Bantu dialect, which is spoken in most parts of east, central and southern Africa. It means news or fresh information, and also refers to a council at which indigenous people meet to discuss important issues.

With this in mind, our monthly newsletter aims to bring the latest NEPAD news, stories and developments to our readers.

You will find this edition enlightening, informative and relevant. In this publication, we focus on the 19th African Union Summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, as well as highlight NEPAD’s key engagements prior to the Summit. We also showcase the impact of our programmes and share some rich traditional aspects of Africa.

I trust that you will find INDABA useful and will enjoy reading it.

Kind regards,
Dr Ibrahim Assane Mayaki 

NEPAD Indaba: a monthly newsletter of the NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency

In this issue

Postcard from Addis by Maureen Nkandu …. read full story»>
NEPAD @ AU Summit in Pictures …. read full story»>
CEO’s quick bits on the AU Summit …. read full story»>
Call for Private-Public sector to boost Africa’s Infrastructure …. read full story»>
NEPAD at Rio+20 …. read full story»>
Tribute to Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, new AUC Chairperson …. read full story»>
If you were President for a day, what would you tell fellow heads of state at the Summit? …. read full story»>
Mayaki acknowledges UNECA’s support for NEPAD Agency …. read full story»>
NEPAD/ECOWAS agreement to empower rural women …. read full story»>
Quick facts on NEPAD …. read full story»>
Youth on development …. read full story»>
Curiozo… on the AU Summit …. read full story»>

New in Africa Renewal
Latest stories and news from the August issue of Africa Renewal magazine.
25 July 2012

SPECIAL FEATURE
African economies capture world attention
Africa’s economic indicators are remarkably positive, capturing the world’s attention

Harnessing African stock exchanges
How the right policies can unleash the power of African stock exchanges

Steady growth in tourism in Africa
Innovation and better infrastructure can draw more visitors

New cash for expanding business
Private equity reaches out to capital-hungry African companies

Mining for development
New calls for contracts to benefit communities
Also in this issue

Rio summit keeps hopes alive
Some gains, plus commitments to future sustainable development talks

Eye on the prize
African schools focus on attaining universal primary education

Mali’s Timbuktu suffers rebel fury
Terror unleashed on the revered Timbuktu mausoleums

Is democracy in West Africa under threat?
Recent coups in Mali and Guinea-Bissau raise eyebrows

Building peace from the ground up
Key roles for civil society in keeping violence at bay

Africa Wired: The BlackBerry sensation in Africa continues
Smartphone’s secret to success is affordability

Book Review: War and Conflict in Africa
A comprehensive overview of the broad patterns of warfare in Africa, and a few possible lessons for achieving peace

New in Africa Renewal

Latest stories and news from the August issue of Africa Renewal magazine.

25 July 2012

SPECIAL FEATURE

African economies capture world attention

Africa’s economic indicators are remarkably positive, capturing the world’s attention

Harnessing African stock exchanges

How the right policies can unleash the power of African stock exchanges

Steady growth in tourism in Africa

Innovation and better infrastructure can draw more visitors

New cash for expanding business

Private equity reaches out to capital-hungry African companies

Mining for development

New calls for contracts to benefit communities

Also in this issue

Rio summit keeps hopes alive

Some gains, plus commitments to future sustainable development talks

Eye on the prize

African schools focus on attaining universal primary education

Mali’s Timbuktu suffers rebel fury

Terror unleashed on the revered Timbuktu mausoleums

Is democracy in West Africa under threat?

Recent coups in Mali and Guinea-Bissau raise eyebrows

Building peace from the ground up

Key roles for civil society in keeping violence at bay

Africa Wired: The BlackBerry sensation in Africa continues

Smartphone’s secret to success is affordability

Book Review: War and Conflict in Africa

A comprehensive overview of the broad patterns of warfare in Africa, and a few possible lessons for achieving peace

Extract of Mrs. Estherine Fotabong, the NEPAD Agency Head of Directorate for Programme Implementation and Coordination, participation to the High-Level side event of OECD on “Green Growth and Developing Countries” held at Rio+20 on 22 June 2012

AfRio

more information on OECD work on Green Growth @oecd

Rio+20

Focus On:
The Bloomberg New Energy Finance Climatescope initiative
On the 19th of June 2012, the “data folks” did well again: Bloomberg New Energy Finance BNEF disclosed Climatescope its new annual ranking and online tool that profiles the “investment climate for climate investment” in Latin America and the Caribbean LAC. The official launch of Climatescope established Brazil, Nicaragua and Panama as the top 3 LAC countries assessing their capability in building a green economy.
 The initiative, jointly developed with MIF (Multilateral Investment Fund – member of Inter-American Development Bank Group), is aimed at drawing up a business index in LAC, through 30 indicators analyse. It highlights the importance of green policies that give green investors stability and predictability, encouraging private investment of green capital flows.
The demo made during the event showed an “extraordinary useful tool” to make the ranking of 26 countries according to 4 interrelated parameters (enabling framework; clean energy investment and climate financing; low-carbon business and clean energy value; green house gas management activities) supported by the various indicators developed by BNEF. As a result, all actors from policy makers to academics via entrepreneurs or users of clean energy can use the friendly interface offered by Climatescope and acquaint themselves with the inspiring case studies. Climatescope is available free of charge on the Internet at the following link: http://climatescope.fomin.org
Michael Liebreich, BNEF CEO, recalled that “in 2011 more than $260 billion have been invested in clean energy worldwide without including the large scale hydro projects”, out of the global total 10% went to Latin America, which is a continent richly endowed in natural capital. This report will contribute to help all stakeholders to find sustainable energy solutions in response to development issues. Will Africa be the next scoped continent? I hope so. 
Organized in the Gavea Golf Club in Rio de Janeiro, the presentation has been followed by a reception where the participants could play with the freshly released Climatescope tool on terminals put at their disposal.
Sarah LawanFrom the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development UNCSD Rio+20

Rio+20

afRio

Focus On:

The Bloomberg New Energy Finance Climatescope initiative

On the 19th of June 2012, the “data folks” did well again: Bloomberg New Energy Finance BNEF disclosed Climatescope its new annual ranking and online tool that profiles the “investment climate for climate investment” in Latin America and the Caribbean LAC. The official launch of Climatescope established Brazil, Nicaragua and Panama as the top 3 LAC countries assessing their capability in building a green economy.

The initiative, jointly developed with MIF (Multilateral Investment Fund – member of Inter-American Development Bank Group), is aimed at drawing up a business index in LAC, through 30 indicators analyse. It highlights the importance of green policies that give green investors stability and predictability, encouraging private investment of green capital flows.

The demo made during the event showed an “extraordinary useful tool” to make the ranking of 26 countries according to 4 interrelated parameters (enabling framework; clean energy investment and climate financing; low-carbon business and clean energy value; green house gas management activities) supported by the various indicators developed by BNEF. As a result, all actors from policy makers to academics via entrepreneurs or users of clean energy can use the friendly interface offered by Climatescope and acquaint themselves with the inspiring case studies. Climatescope is available free of charge on the Internet at the following link: http://climatescope.fomin.org

Michael Liebreich, BNEF CEO, recalled that “in 2011 more than $260 billion have been invested in clean energy worldwide without including the large scale hydro projects”, out of the global total 10% went to Latin America, which is a continent richly endowed in natural capital. This report will contribute to help all stakeholders to find sustainable energy solutions in response to development issues. Will Africa be the next scoped continent? I hope so. 

Organized in the Gavea Golf Club in Rio de Janeiro, the presentation has been followed by a reception where the participants could play with the freshly released Climatescope tool on terminals put at their disposal.

Sarah Lawan
From the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development UNCSD Rio+20

Development Banks commit to fostering sustainable development

06/19/2012
• IDFC, a club that unites 19 institutions from around the world, released a document after a meeting at the BNDES’ headquarters At a meeting held on June 19 at the headquarters of the BNDES, executives from development banks and funding agencies that comprise the International Development Finance Club (IDFC) issued a statement containing the club’s principles for fostering sustainable development. In the document, members of the group, which includes 19 institutions from all continents, committed to collaborating with knowledge, resources and tools to facilitate and accelerate the transition process to a more sustainable, social and ecological economy. Among the commitments made to help economic agents adopt new levels in their environmental practices, there is support for sustainable investments in the infrastructure area and the development of new financial instruments based on sustainability and innovation. The full document can be accessed in Portuguese (http://migre.me/9yNcM) and English (http://migre.me/9yNdD). “Development banks are a very powerful tool for inclusive and sustainable development,” said the BNDES’ president, Luciano Coutinho. He also recalled the importance of the “stabilizing role” of such institutions in times of crisis like the present. The President of IDFC and German development bank KfW, Ulrich Schroeder, highlighted the experience of members of the club in “combining public and private funds in financing development”. Renewable energy, public transport, water and sanitation are among the sectors of infrastructure to be strengthened. The IDFC’s other commitment is to help reduce incentives to non-sustainable production. In the afternoon, the executives of the IDFC attended the international seminar on Financing the Green Economy and the Sustainable Development, held at the BNDES’ headquarters.The conference, which marked the 60th anniversary of the Bank, allowed the exchange of experiences on sustainability on the eve of the meeting of Heads of State at Rio+20.
@bndes

Development Banks commit to fostering sustainable development

06/19/2012

• IDFC, a club that unites 19 institutions from around the world, released a document after a meeting at the BNDES’ headquarters 

At a meeting held on June 19 at the headquarters of the BNDES, executives from development banks and funding agencies that comprise the International Development Finance Club (IDFC) issued a statement containing the club’s principles for fostering sustainable development. 

In the document, members of the group, which includes 19 institutions from all continents, committed to collaborating with knowledge, resources and tools to facilitate and accelerate the transition process to a more sustainable, social and ecological economy. 

Among the commitments made to help economic agents adopt new levels in their environmental practices, there is support for sustainable investments in the infrastructure area and the development of new financial instruments based on sustainability and innovation. The full document can be accessed in Portuguese (http://migre.me/9yNcM) and English (http://migre.me/9yNdD). 

“Development banks are a very powerful tool for inclusive and sustainable development,” said the BNDES’ president, Luciano Coutinho. He also recalled the importance of the “stabilizing role” of such institutions in times of crisis like the present. 

The President of IDFC and German development bank KfW, Ulrich Schroeder, highlighted the experience of members of the club in “combining public and private funds in financing development”. 

Renewable energy, public transport, water and sanitation are among the sectors of infrastructure to be strengthened. The IDFC’s other commitment is to help reduce incentives to non-sustainable production. 

In the afternoon, the executives of the IDFC attended the international seminar on Financing the Green Economy and the Sustainable Development, held at the BNDES’ headquarters.

The conference, which marked the 60th anniversary of the Bank, allowed the exchange of experiences on sustainability on the eve of the meeting of Heads of State at Rio+20.

@bndes

Rio+20

Focus On:
The UNU “twin institute” concept
While I was attending the United Nations University UNU side-event entitled “Global Governance Mechanisms for Boosting Green Innovation” today, the 15th of June 2012, at Riocentro, I was stricken by the presentation made by Dr. Timothy Afful-Koomson, Environmental Policy Fellow at the United Nations University Institute for Natural Resources in Africa (UNU-INRA) based in Accra, Ghana. As the UNU-INRA Institute will deliver its first educational programme in September 2013 under the form of a joint (with UNU-WIDER) PhD in Development Economics, it highlights the march of the “twin institutes” concept:
A twin can be defined as a UNU institute with all the privileges and characteristics of UNU. The main idea that underlies the implementation of a Twin is building true partnerships in research and education and working against brain-drain. Through its Africa Strategy, UNU plays a strategic role in Africa as a facilitator of dialogue, a capacity builder, a provider of postgraduate training, and a promoter of innovation. […] UNU activities in and on Africa aim to foster knowledge creation with a strong emphasis on home-grown and participatory “made-to-fit” solutions.
By conducting research together, the “twin institutes” will aim at fostering knowledge exchanges between “developed countries” and “developing and transitional countries” in an unprecedented way. This genuine partnership will develop better understanding among academics from both sides. As a result, their expertise will be more accurate and enable to tackle the challenges that Africa is facing. Not only the concept allows technology dissemination but also it builds capacity on the ground.
Coming next is the joint curriculum focusing on “sustainable management of resources, such as water, soil, and waste” that will be undertaken by UNU-FLORES and its “twin institute” in Maputo, Mozambique. To be continued…
Finally it is a good occasion to recall the UNU-ViE Priority Africa Initiative’s objective of collaboratively gathering knowledge for the sake of African development. The UNU-ViE team produced an impressive African mapping of their projects entitled “Spotlight on Africa”.
http://inra.unu.edu/
http://vie.unu.edu/article/read/priority-africa
http://vie.unu.edu/file/get/9214
Sarah Lawan
From the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development UNCSD Rio+20

Rio+20

AfRio

Focus On:

The UNU “twin institute” concept

While I was attending the United Nations University UNU side-event entitled “Global Governance Mechanisms for Boosting Green Innovation” today, the 15th of June 2012, at Riocentro, I was stricken by the presentation made by Dr. Timothy Afful-Koomson, Environmental Policy Fellow at the United Nations University Institute for Natural Resources in Africa (UNU-INRA) based in Accra, Ghana. As the UNU-INRA Institute will deliver its first educational programme in September 2013 under the form of a joint (with UNU-WIDER) PhD in Development Economics, it highlights the march of the “twin institutes” concept:

A twin can be defined as a UNU institute with all the privileges and characteristics of UNU. The main idea that underlies the implementation of a Twin is building true partnerships in research and education and working against brain-drain. Through its Africa Strategy, UNU plays a strategic role in Africa as a facilitator of dialogue, a capacity builder, a provider of postgraduate training, and a promoter of innovation. […] UNU activities in and on Africa aim to foster knowledge creation with a strong emphasis on home-grown and participatory “made-to-fit” solutions.

By conducting research together, the “twin institutes” will aim at fostering knowledge exchanges between “developed countries” and “developing and transitional countries” in an unprecedented way. This genuine partnership will develop better understanding among academics from both sides. As a result, their expertise will be more accurate and enable to tackle the challenges that Africa is facing. Not only the concept allows technology dissemination but also it builds capacity on the ground.

Coming next is the joint curriculum focusing on “sustainable management of resources, such as water, soil, and waste” that will be undertaken by UNU-FLORES and its “twin institute” in Maputo, Mozambique. To be continued…

Finally it is a good occasion to recall the UNU-ViE Priority Africa Initiative’s objective of collaboratively gathering knowledge for the sake of African development. The UNU-ViE team produced an impressive African mapping of their projects entitled “Spotlight on Africa”.

http://inra.unu.edu/

http://vie.unu.edu/article/read/priority-africa

http://vie.unu.edu/file/get/9214

Sarah Lawan

From the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development UNCSD Rio+20

Op-Ed: Global Governance and African Reality (Kandeh Yumkella)

thursday, 17 may 2012

There are few hotter topics on the international agenda than sustainability. The theme has been a mainstay of international conferences, and the biggest of them all — the UN’s Rio+20 conference — will begin just over a month from now. Kandeh K. Yumkella, head of UNIDO, the UN agency that promotes industrial development, explains what’s at stake for Africa.

Read more on TheGlobalist.com.

Declaration of Indigenous Peoples of Africa on Sustainable Development and Rio +20

We the representatives of Indigenous Peoples of Africa met in the city of Arusha, United Republic of Tanzania, on 19 April 2012, for a preparatory meeting on sustainable development, to deliberate on the objectives, themes and substantive matters for indigenous peoples to Rio+20;

Committed to the success of the Rio+20 Conference and having as an objective to promote sustainable development focusing on human rights;

Recognising the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ rights;

Taking into Consideration The Malabo African Union General decision to ensure that Africa’s interests on the Green Economy issues within the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication and institutional frameworks for sustainable development are defined and taken into account;

Welcoming the work of the African Commission on Human and Peoples Rights and its Working group on indigenous populations/communities and taking its guidance on indigenous peoples as an important indicator for the existence of and the rights of indigenous peoples in Africa;

Taking into consideration the Resolution No. ACHPR/Res153(XLVI)09 on “climate change and human rights and the need to study its impact in Africa”, adopted by the African Commission on Human and Peoples Rights, calling for a human rights-based approach to climate change in Africa;

Reaffirming the Pan African Climate Justice Alliance (PACJA) led African Civil Society Limbe Declaration on Rio+20;

Recognising that the livelihoods of indigenous peoples are under threat in the name of modern development paradigms.

Acknowledging the fact that indigenous peoples’ contribution to the UNCSD/Rio+20 process and its outcome is essential for informed policy formulation and for monitoring of the implementation of its outcomes at all levels;

Reaffirming the need for the Rio+20 process to take a strong human rights-based approach, where the rights of indigenous peoples amongst others are fully recognized, respected and protected;

Acknowledging the fact that the principles, agreements and commitments established in the Rio Declaration of 1992, Agenda 21 and the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation are still fully in effect, and the need to strengthen the commitments as defined in these agreements in the upcoming Rio+20 Conference;

Confirming our support of and contribution to the development of sustainable development goals, in order to proceed with the design of new development models, made within the framework of the discussions for Rio+20, and that this can become an important tool to focus on goals that ensure the integration of culture and good governance in the three pillars of sustainable development;

Affirming that the rights of people to development imply the recognition of the collective rights of indigenous peoples to overcome poverty, to eliminate inequality and social exclusion, to promote life in harmony with nature, spirituality and culture under the principles of Agenda 21 and other relevant instruments; and the recognition that these rights be implemented in an inclusive and interdependent manner;

Reaffirming the importance of full and effective participation of indigenous peoples in all Rio+20 processes and decision-making;

Concerned by the weakness and or inexistence of legal as well as institutional frameworks for the protection, promotion and respect of indigenous peoples’ rights in Africa;

Deeply Concerned that Indigenous Peoples livelihoods have been compromised by new and emerging challenges; these are increasing water scarcity, biodiversity and ecosystem loss, desertification, low resilience to natural disasters, food crisis, conflict, energy crisis, cultural erosion, infringed intellectual property rights, climate change, land grab and land degradation, which have increased poverty, diseases and impacted negatively on indigenous peoples;

Concerned that Indigenous Peoples’ rights to development and well-being have been limited by the current development models hence calling on governments to allocate resources for the facilitation of the formulation and subsequent implementation of Indigenous Peoples Development Goals (IPDGs);

Taking Into Account the fact that the concept of green economy needs to be defined in the indigenous peoples holistic context; considering indigenous peoples local diverse economies, traditional knowledge and occupations and the importance of safeguards for this concept;

We declare that:

On the Green Economy in the Context of Sustainable Development and Poverty Eradication,

1. African Indigenous Peoples continue to challenge the dominant development models that have not contributed to sustainable development, poverty alleviation and the preservation of the environment.

2. Currently the three pillars of sustainable development are “environment”, “economy” and “social”. We strongly believe that the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples should serve as a key framework, which underpins all international and national policies and programmes on sustainable development. Ratification of ILO Convention No.169 on indigenous peoples by African countries is to be considered as further measure to be taken.

3. A sustainable low carbon, equitable economy is not a new concept as it has been practiced by Africas’ Indigenous Peoples for millennia. We therefore call on African states to develop low carbon economies and move to local, national and regional economies which are sustainable, equitable and assist in environmental rehabilitation, resilience and adaptive capacities of Indigenous Peoples.

4. African Indigenous Peoples are determined to contribute by showcasing their good practices of local diverse green economies in Rio and beyond, reflecting traditional knowledge and ways of living, in order to create awareness, and inform and influence policy processes at the national, regional and international levels.

5. As our contribution to sustainable development, we will continue to define our development goals based on our cultural, social and economic knowledge, occupations, practices and technologies.

6. We are repeating our call on African governments to respect the rights of Indigenous Peoples towards Rio+ 20 and beyond, as enshrined in the Convention on Biological Diversity, Agenda 21, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and ILO Convention No. 169.

7. We further urge governments and regional organizations/financial institutions to allocate resources to enable the capacity building and the full and effective participation of Indigenous Peoples in international, regional and national processes related to the Rio conventions and other sustainable development related dialogues and processes.

On the Institutional Framework for Sustainable Development and Governance,

8. There is an urgent need in strengthening, reforming and integrating the three pillars of sustainable development, inter alia by adding culture as a fourth pillar of sustainable development.

9. We support the position of the African Governments and African Civil Society to strengthen UNEP and transform it into a specialized UN Agency. Its mandate should include the protection and promotion of the rights of the indigenous peoples of the world. In this regard, we further recommend that UNEP adopts a strong policy on Indigenous Peoples.

10. We are in support of the African consensus position on the establishment of Sustainable Development Councils at National level; but with meaningful and effective participation of indigenous peoples. We strongly recommend African States to take into consideration the Resolution on climate change and indigenous peoples adopted by the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights.

11. African states should adopt specific legal frameworks that recognize, protect and promote indigenous peoples as rights-holders, including ratification of ILO Convention No.169 on indigenous peoples.

12. In order to promote conservation of ecosystems, environmental governance in Africa must encourage the recognition of the rights of Indigenous Peoples, which includes the right to access and manage their own land and territories. As key rights holders who have been stewards of natural resources for generations, they must be integrally involved in discussions and decisions concerning their environment.

13. There is a need for the contemporary knowledge, science and technology community and the indigenous knowledge, science and technology community to develop a mutual alignment and synergy in order to feed into research, training and development as well as policy formulation.

14. We are in total support of the African Civil Society call on African Governments to accelerate the implementation of Principle 10 of the Rio 1992 Declaration by first implementing the current UNEP guidelines on this principle with a view to initiate an African Convention on Principle 10.

Done in Arusha, this Nineteenth Day of the Month of April, the Year Two Thousand and Twelve.

For more information contact; 

Mainyoito Pastoralist Integrated Development Organization (MPIDO) 

Marist Lane Off Langata Road, P.O. Box 226 – Kiserian, Kenya 

Tel/Fax: +254 20 882944/50 Cell: 254 723 561 Email: mpido@mpido.org OR soikan.meitiaki@mpido.org 

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR The Future We Want By BAN KI-MOON Published: May 23, 2012

Twenty years ago, there was the Earth Summit. Gathering in Rio de Janiero, world leaders agreed on an ambitious blueprint for a more secure future. They sought to balance the imperatives of robust economic growth and the needs of a growing population against the ecological necessity to conserve our planet’s most precious resources — land, air and water. And they agreed that the only way to do this was to break with the old economic model and invent a new one. They called it sustainable development.

Two decades later […]

Sphere within a Sphere by Arnaldo Pomodoro located in front of the UN
Second Round of ‘Informal-Informal’ Negotiations on the zero draft of outcome document of the UN Conference on Sustainable Development (UNCSD or Rio+20)

23 April - 04 May 2012 | UN headquarters, New York, United States of America


Daily web coverage (click on the following links to see our daily web pages)
23 April - 24 April - 25 April - 26 April- 27 April- 30 April- 1 May - 2 May - 3 May
Coverage on @iisd

Sphere within a Sphere by Arnaldo Pomodoro located in front of the UN

Second Round of ‘Informal-Informal’ Negotiations on the zero draft of outcome document of the UN Conference on Sustainable Development (UNCSD or Rio+20)

23 April - 04 May 2012 | UN headquarters, New York, United States of America

Daily web coverage (click on the following links to see our daily web pages)

23 April - 24 April - 25 April - 26 April- 27 April- 30 April- 1 May - 2 May - 3 May

Coverage on @iisd

New in Africa Renewal
As Africa prepares for the Rio+20 Sustainable Development Conference, the continent’s report card shows some progress and many challenges.
28 March 2012

SPECIAL FEATURE
The future we want
To Rio and beyond: Africa seeks sustainable solutions
Special feature: Sustainable development

A compendium of Africa’s priority areas
Sustainable development priority areas show a mix of challenges and progress 

Interview with Greenpeace’s Kumi Naidoo
‘Only our collective voice will be heard’ 

Interview with Joan Clos, UN-Habitat
For sustainable cities, Africa needs planning 

How a community radio station in Kenya is changing the lives of shack dwellers
With new outlet, Korogocho residents push for reforms 

Towards a vision of African cities without slums
Governments set course towards improving poor urban areas
Also in this issue

Oil subsidy controversy in Nigeria
Government’s attempt to remove oil subsidy backfires, resulting in violent street protests 

Africa Renewal is 25 years old
A story of how the journey started 

Malian fabrics create beauty, profit
Hand-dyed fabrics win praises, capture markets 

Book Review
Africa Renewal reviews More Than Good Intentions: How a New Economics Is Helping to Solve Global Poverty by Dean Karlan and Jacob Appel 

Africa Wired
Mobile phones get smarter in rural Africa

New in Africa Renewal

As Africa prepares for the Rio+20 Sustainable Development Conference, the continent’s report card shows some progress and many challenges.

28 March 2012

SPECIAL FEATURE

The future
we want

To Rio and beyond: Africa seeks sustainable solutions

Special feature: Sustainable development

A compendium of Africa’s priority areas

Sustainable development priority areas show a mix of challenges and progress
 

Interview with Greenpeace’s Kumi Naidoo

‘Only our collective voice will be heard’
 

Interview with Joan Clos, UN-Habitat

For sustainable cities, Africa needs planning
 

How a community radio station in Kenya is changing the lives of shack dwellers

With new outlet, Korogocho residents push for reforms
 

Towards a vision of African cities without slums

Governments set course towards improving poor urban areas

Also in this issue

Oil subsidy controversy in Nigeria

Government’s attempt to remove oil subsidy backfires, resulting in violent street protests
 

Africa Renewal is 25 years old

A story of how the journey started
 

Malian fabrics create beauty, profit

Hand-dyed fabrics win praises, capture markets
 

Book Review

Africa Renewal reviews More Than Good Intentions: How a New Economics Is Helping to Solve Global Poverty by Dean Karlan and Jacob Appel
 

Africa Wired

Mobile phones get smarter in rural Africa