Rio+20

Focus On:
The Bloomberg New Energy Finance Climatescope initiative
On the 19th of June 2012, the “data folks” did well again: Bloomberg New Energy Finance BNEF disclosed Climatescope its new annual ranking and online tool that profiles the “investment climate for climate investment” in Latin America and the Caribbean LAC. The official launch of Climatescope established Brazil, Nicaragua and Panama as the top 3 LAC countries assessing their capability in building a green economy.
 The initiative, jointly developed with MIF (Multilateral Investment Fund – member of Inter-American Development Bank Group), is aimed at drawing up a business index in LAC, through 30 indicators analyse. It highlights the importance of green policies that give green investors stability and predictability, encouraging private investment of green capital flows.
The demo made during the event showed an “extraordinary useful tool” to make the ranking of 26 countries according to 4 interrelated parameters (enabling framework; clean energy investment and climate financing; low-carbon business and clean energy value; green house gas management activities) supported by the various indicators developed by BNEF. As a result, all actors from policy makers to academics via entrepreneurs or users of clean energy can use the friendly interface offered by Climatescope and acquaint themselves with the inspiring case studies. Climatescope is available free of charge on the Internet at the following link: http://climatescope.fomin.org
Michael Liebreich, BNEF CEO, recalled that “in 2011 more than $260 billion have been invested in clean energy worldwide without including the large scale hydro projects”, out of the global total 10% went to Latin America, which is a continent richly endowed in natural capital. This report will contribute to help all stakeholders to find sustainable energy solutions in response to development issues. Will Africa be the next scoped continent? I hope so. 
Organized in the Gavea Golf Club in Rio de Janeiro, the presentation has been followed by a reception where the participants could play with the freshly released Climatescope tool on terminals put at their disposal.
Sarah LawanFrom the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development UNCSD Rio+20

Rio+20

afRio

Focus On:

The Bloomberg New Energy Finance Climatescope initiative

On the 19th of June 2012, the “data folks” did well again: Bloomberg New Energy Finance BNEF disclosed Climatescope its new annual ranking and online tool that profiles the “investment climate for climate investment” in Latin America and the Caribbean LAC. The official launch of Climatescope established Brazil, Nicaragua and Panama as the top 3 LAC countries assessing their capability in building a green economy.

The initiative, jointly developed with MIF (Multilateral Investment Fund – member of Inter-American Development Bank Group), is aimed at drawing up a business index in LAC, through 30 indicators analyse. It highlights the importance of green policies that give green investors stability and predictability, encouraging private investment of green capital flows.

The demo made during the event showed an “extraordinary useful tool” to make the ranking of 26 countries according to 4 interrelated parameters (enabling framework; clean energy investment and climate financing; low-carbon business and clean energy value; green house gas management activities) supported by the various indicators developed by BNEF. As a result, all actors from policy makers to academics via entrepreneurs or users of clean energy can use the friendly interface offered by Climatescope and acquaint themselves with the inspiring case studies. Climatescope is available free of charge on the Internet at the following link: http://climatescope.fomin.org

Michael Liebreich, BNEF CEO, recalled that “in 2011 more than $260 billion have been invested in clean energy worldwide without including the large scale hydro projects”, out of the global total 10% went to Latin America, which is a continent richly endowed in natural capital. This report will contribute to help all stakeholders to find sustainable energy solutions in response to development issues. Will Africa be the next scoped continent? I hope so. 

Organized in the Gavea Golf Club in Rio de Janeiro, the presentation has been followed by a reception where the participants could play with the freshly released Climatescope tool on terminals put at their disposal.

Sarah Lawan
From the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development UNCSD Rio+20

Development Banks commit to fostering sustainable development

06/19/2012
• IDFC, a club that unites 19 institutions from around the world, released a document after a meeting at the BNDES’ headquarters At a meeting held on June 19 at the headquarters of the BNDES, executives from development banks and funding agencies that comprise the International Development Finance Club (IDFC) issued a statement containing the club’s principles for fostering sustainable development. In the document, members of the group, which includes 19 institutions from all continents, committed to collaborating with knowledge, resources and tools to facilitate and accelerate the transition process to a more sustainable, social and ecological economy. Among the commitments made to help economic agents adopt new levels in their environmental practices, there is support for sustainable investments in the infrastructure area and the development of new financial instruments based on sustainability and innovation. The full document can be accessed in Portuguese (http://migre.me/9yNcM) and English (http://migre.me/9yNdD). “Development banks are a very powerful tool for inclusive and sustainable development,” said the BNDES’ president, Luciano Coutinho. He also recalled the importance of the “stabilizing role” of such institutions in times of crisis like the present. The President of IDFC and German development bank KfW, Ulrich Schroeder, highlighted the experience of members of the club in “combining public and private funds in financing development”. Renewable energy, public transport, water and sanitation are among the sectors of infrastructure to be strengthened. The IDFC’s other commitment is to help reduce incentives to non-sustainable production. In the afternoon, the executives of the IDFC attended the international seminar on Financing the Green Economy and the Sustainable Development, held at the BNDES’ headquarters.The conference, which marked the 60th anniversary of the Bank, allowed the exchange of experiences on sustainability on the eve of the meeting of Heads of State at Rio+20.
@bndes

Development Banks commit to fostering sustainable development

06/19/2012

• IDFC, a club that unites 19 institutions from around the world, released a document after a meeting at the BNDES’ headquarters 

At a meeting held on June 19 at the headquarters of the BNDES, executives from development banks and funding agencies that comprise the International Development Finance Club (IDFC) issued a statement containing the club’s principles for fostering sustainable development. 

In the document, members of the group, which includes 19 institutions from all continents, committed to collaborating with knowledge, resources and tools to facilitate and accelerate the transition process to a more sustainable, social and ecological economy. 

Among the commitments made to help economic agents adopt new levels in their environmental practices, there is support for sustainable investments in the infrastructure area and the development of new financial instruments based on sustainability and innovation. The full document can be accessed in Portuguese (http://migre.me/9yNcM) and English (http://migre.me/9yNdD). 

“Development banks are a very powerful tool for inclusive and sustainable development,” said the BNDES’ president, Luciano Coutinho. He also recalled the importance of the “stabilizing role” of such institutions in times of crisis like the present. 

The President of IDFC and German development bank KfW, Ulrich Schroeder, highlighted the experience of members of the club in “combining public and private funds in financing development”. 

Renewable energy, public transport, water and sanitation are among the sectors of infrastructure to be strengthened. The IDFC’s other commitment is to help reduce incentives to non-sustainable production. 

In the afternoon, the executives of the IDFC attended the international seminar on Financing the Green Economy and the Sustainable Development, held at the BNDES’ headquarters.

The conference, which marked the 60th anniversary of the Bank, allowed the exchange of experiences on sustainability on the eve of the meeting of Heads of State at Rio+20.

@bndes

Op-Ed: Global Governance and African Reality (Kandeh Yumkella)

thursday, 17 may 2012

There are few hotter topics on the international agenda than sustainability. The theme has been a mainstay of international conferences, and the biggest of them all — the UN’s Rio+20 conference — will begin just over a month from now. Kandeh K. Yumkella, head of UNIDO, the UN agency that promotes industrial development, explains what’s at stake for Africa.

Read more on TheGlobalist.com.

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR The Future We Want By BAN KI-MOON Published: May 23, 2012

Twenty years ago, there was the Earth Summit. Gathering in Rio de Janiero, world leaders agreed on an ambitious blueprint for a more secure future. They sought to balance the imperatives of robust economic growth and the needs of a growing population against the ecological necessity to conserve our planet’s most precious resources — land, air and water. And they agreed that the only way to do this was to break with the old economic model and invent a new one. They called it sustainable development.

Two decades later […]

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR Powering Sustainable Energy for All By BAN KI-MOON Published: January 11, 2012

As a child growing up during the Korean War, I studied by candlelight. Electric conveniences such as refrigerators and fans were largely unknown. Yet within my lifetime, that reality changed utterly. Easy access to energy opened abundant new possibilities for my family and my nation. […]

UN SECRETARY-GENERAL BRIEFS MEMBER STATES ON ‘SUSTAINABLE ENERGY FOR ALL’ INITIATIVE, NAMES LEADERS OF HIGH-LEVEL ACTION GROUP

This is the text of remarks by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to General Assembly Members in New York today at a briefing on “Sustainable Energy for All”:

Energy is central to everything we do, from powering our economies to empowering women, from generating jobs to strengthening security.  It cuts across all sectors of government and lies at the heart of a country’s core interests.

Yesterday, we marked the global population topping 7 billion people.  One person in five lacks access to modern energy; 3 billion people rely on wood, coal, charcoal or dung for cooking and heating.  They are energy-poor.  And energy poverty translates into grinding, dehumanizing poverty.  Now more than ever, the world needs to ensure that the benefits of sustainable modern energy are available to all.

Energy poverty is a threat to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.  It holds back economic growth and job creation.  At the same time, we must move very rapidly toward a clean energy economy to prevent the dangerous warming of our planet.  We need to catalyse low-carbon economic opportunity across the globe, particularly in developing countries where needs are greatest.

Last year, the General Assembly passed a resolution declaring 2012 the International Year of Sustainable Energy for All.  This September, I launched my “Sustainable Energy for All” initiative.  It contributes to the Year by mobilizing action by all key stakeholders – governments, the private sector and civil society.

Today I am releasing my vision statement on sustainable energy for all.  I have set three objectives, all to be achieved by 2030.  First:  ensure universal access to modern energy services.  Second:  double the rate of improvement of energy efficiency.  Third:  double the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix.

The world is hungry for solutions to global challenges.  This initiative provides them on multiple levels.  Taken in combination, these objectives will enhance equity, revitalize the global economy, and help protect the ecosystems that sustain us.  I call these the three Es:  equity, economy and ecosystems.  These are one and the same agenda:  the sustainable development agenda.  We cannot make lasting progress in one without progress on all.

I have heard strong support for “Sustainable Energy for All” across the spectrum.  The up-front costs are not small.  But the long-term returns can be massive.  Sustainable energy for all offers powerful benefits – for stimulating economic growth, reducing poverty, cleaner air, reduced mortality and reduced risk of dangerous climate change.

What is standing between us and these achievements?  Political will — and resources both private and public.

The “Sustainable Energy for All” initiative is gathering the broad-based support we need — from developed countries, emerging economies, developing countries, the private sector and civil society.  Today I am pleased to announce the members of the High-Level Group on Sustainable Energy for All.  The Group is co-chaired by Kandeh Yumkella, the Chair of United Nations Energy and Executive Director of United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), and Charles Holliday, Chairman of Bank of America.  The “Sustainable Energy for All” Group includes more than 30 distinguished global leaders from around the world – business, finance, governments, civil society.  The Group will develop an action agenda in support of the 2030 goal.  It will mobilize a broad range of stakeholders who can catalyse commitments and form partnerships that can be launched at Rio+20.

I urge you to lend your support.  Together we can make sustainable energy for all a catalyst for lasting economic growth that benefits all people, gives opportunity to the poor and protects the planet.

@un