Africa Human Development Report 2012: Towards a Food Secure Future
Published on 15 May 2012
Document Summary
The 2012 Human Development Report for Africa explores why dehumanizing hunger remains pervasive in the region, despite abundant agricultural resources, a favorable growing climate, and rapid economic growth rates. It also emphasizes that food security – the ability to consistently acquire enough calories and nutrients for a healthy and productive life - is essential for human development.  
To boost food security, it argues for action in four interrelated areas: agricultural productivity, nutrition, access to food, and empowerment of the rural poor. It asserts that increasing agricultural productivity in sustainable ways can bolster food production and economic opportunities, thereby improving food availability and increasing purchasing power. Effective nutrition policies can create conditions for the proper use and absorption of calories and nutrients. Finally, empowering the rural poor - especially women - and harnessing the power of information, innovation, and markets can promote equitable allocation of food and resources within families and across communities.
Highlights
Sub-Saharan Africa’s population, 856 million in 2010, is projected to exceed 2 billion shortly after 2050.
More than one in four Africans - close to 218 million people - is undernourished.
Two major biases – towards towns rather than rural areas and towards men, not women – have been principal factors in explaining Africa’s food insecurity.
African governments spend between 5-10% of their budgets on agriculture, well below the 20% average that Asian governments devoted to the sector during the green revolution there.
Women are significant food producers, but their control of land in sub-Saharan Africa is less than in any other region.
@undp

Africa Human Development Report 2012: Towards a Food Secure Future

Published on 15 May 2012

Document Summary

The 2012 Human Development Report for Africa explores why dehumanizing hunger remains pervasive in the region, despite abundant agricultural resources, a favorable growing climate, and rapid economic growth rates. It also emphasizes that food security – the ability to consistently acquire enough calories and nutrients for a healthy and productive life - is essential for human development.  

To boost food security, it argues for action in four interrelated areas: agricultural productivity, nutrition, access to food, and empowerment of the rural poor. It asserts that increasing agricultural productivity in sustainable ways can bolster food production and economic opportunities, thereby improving food availability and increasing purchasing power. Effective nutrition policies can create conditions for the proper use and absorption of calories and nutrients. Finally, empowering the rural poor - especially women - and harnessing the power of information, innovation, and markets can promote equitable allocation of food and resources within families and across communities.

Highlights

  • Sub-Saharan Africa’s population, 856 million in 2010, is projected to exceed 2 billion shortly after 2050.
  • More than one in four Africans - close to 218 million people - is undernourished.
  • Two major biases – towards towns rather than rural areas and towards men, not women – have been principal factors in explaining Africa’s food insecurity.
  • African governments spend between 5-10% of their budgets on agriculture, well below the 20% average that Asian governments devoted to the sector during the green revolution there.
  • Women are significant food producers, but their control of land in sub-Saharan Africa is less than in any other region.

@undp

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR The Future We Want By BAN KI-MOON Published: May 23, 2012

Twenty years ago, there was the Earth Summit. Gathering in Rio de Janiero, world leaders agreed on an ambitious blueprint for a more secure future. They sought to balance the imperatives of robust economic growth and the needs of a growing population against the ecological necessity to conserve our planet’s most precious resources — land, air and water. And they agreed that the only way to do this was to break with the old economic model and invent a new one. They called it sustainable development.

Two decades later […]

Sustainable Energy Finance Summer Academy
21 - 26 October 2012 Nairobi, Kenya




Promoting Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiency

Given the importance of the financial industry in shaping the world’s response to climate change and the rapidly increasing global demand for new energy solutions, Frankfurt School of Finance & Management decided to develop its course on Sustainable Energy Finance (SEF). Now we are proud to present our two Summer Academies for 2012 within the new framework of the Frankfurt School – UNEP Collaborating Centre for Climate & Sustainable Energy Finance (the Centre).
Sustainable Energy Finance Summer Academy 21 - 26 October 2012 Nairobi, Kenya

Promoting Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiency

Given the importance of the financial industry in shaping the world’s response to climate change and the rapidly increasing global demand for new energy solutions, Frankfurt School of Finance & Management decided to develop its course on Sustainable Energy Finance (SEF). Now we are proud to present our two Summer Academies for 2012 within the new framework of the Frankfurt School – UNEP Collaborating Centre for Climate & Sustainable Energy Finance (the Centre).

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR Powering Sustainable Energy for All By BAN KI-MOON Published: January 11, 2012

As a child growing up during the Korean War, I studied by candlelight. Electric conveniences such as refrigerators and fans were largely unknown. Yet within my lifetime, that reality changed utterly. Easy access to energy opened abundant new possibilities for my family and my nation. […]