Op-Ed: Global Governance and African Reality (Kandeh Yumkella)

thursday, 17 may 2012

There are few hotter topics on the international agenda than sustainability. The theme has been a mainstay of international conferences, and the biggest of them all — the UN’s Rio+20 conference — will begin just over a month from now. Kandeh K. Yumkella, head of UNIDO, the UN agency that promotes industrial development, explains what’s at stake for Africa.

Read more on TheGlobalist.com.

Declaration of Indigenous Peoples of Africa on Sustainable Development and Rio +20

We the representatives of Indigenous Peoples of Africa met in the city of Arusha, United Republic of Tanzania, on 19 April 2012, for a preparatory meeting on sustainable development, to deliberate on the objectives, themes and substantive matters for indigenous peoples to Rio+20;

Committed to the success of the Rio+20 Conference and having as an objective to promote sustainable development focusing on human rights;

Recognising the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ rights;

Taking into Consideration The Malabo African Union General decision to ensure that Africa’s interests on the Green Economy issues within the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication and institutional frameworks for sustainable development are defined and taken into account;

Welcoming the work of the African Commission on Human and Peoples Rights and its Working group on indigenous populations/communities and taking its guidance on indigenous peoples as an important indicator for the existence of and the rights of indigenous peoples in Africa;

Taking into consideration the Resolution No. ACHPR/Res153(XLVI)09 on “climate change and human rights and the need to study its impact in Africa”, adopted by the African Commission on Human and Peoples Rights, calling for a human rights-based approach to climate change in Africa;

Reaffirming the Pan African Climate Justice Alliance (PACJA) led African Civil Society Limbe Declaration on Rio+20;

Recognising that the livelihoods of indigenous peoples are under threat in the name of modern development paradigms.

Acknowledging the fact that indigenous peoples’ contribution to the UNCSD/Rio+20 process and its outcome is essential for informed policy formulation and for monitoring of the implementation of its outcomes at all levels;

Reaffirming the need for the Rio+20 process to take a strong human rights-based approach, where the rights of indigenous peoples amongst others are fully recognized, respected and protected;

Acknowledging the fact that the principles, agreements and commitments established in the Rio Declaration of 1992, Agenda 21 and the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation are still fully in effect, and the need to strengthen the commitments as defined in these agreements in the upcoming Rio+20 Conference;

Confirming our support of and contribution to the development of sustainable development goals, in order to proceed with the design of new development models, made within the framework of the discussions for Rio+20, and that this can become an important tool to focus on goals that ensure the integration of culture and good governance in the three pillars of sustainable development;

Affirming that the rights of people to development imply the recognition of the collective rights of indigenous peoples to overcome poverty, to eliminate inequality and social exclusion, to promote life in harmony with nature, spirituality and culture under the principles of Agenda 21 and other relevant instruments; and the recognition that these rights be implemented in an inclusive and interdependent manner;

Reaffirming the importance of full and effective participation of indigenous peoples in all Rio+20 processes and decision-making;

Concerned by the weakness and or inexistence of legal as well as institutional frameworks for the protection, promotion and respect of indigenous peoples’ rights in Africa;

Deeply Concerned that Indigenous Peoples livelihoods have been compromised by new and emerging challenges; these are increasing water scarcity, biodiversity and ecosystem loss, desertification, low resilience to natural disasters, food crisis, conflict, energy crisis, cultural erosion, infringed intellectual property rights, climate change, land grab and land degradation, which have increased poverty, diseases and impacted negatively on indigenous peoples;

Concerned that Indigenous Peoples’ rights to development and well-being have been limited by the current development models hence calling on governments to allocate resources for the facilitation of the formulation and subsequent implementation of Indigenous Peoples Development Goals (IPDGs);

Taking Into Account the fact that the concept of green economy needs to be defined in the indigenous peoples holistic context; considering indigenous peoples local diverse economies, traditional knowledge and occupations and the importance of safeguards for this concept;

We declare that:

On the Green Economy in the Context of Sustainable Development and Poverty Eradication,

1. African Indigenous Peoples continue to challenge the dominant development models that have not contributed to sustainable development, poverty alleviation and the preservation of the environment.

2. Currently the three pillars of sustainable development are “environment”, “economy” and “social”. We strongly believe that the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples should serve as a key framework, which underpins all international and national policies and programmes on sustainable development. Ratification of ILO Convention No.169 on indigenous peoples by African countries is to be considered as further measure to be taken.

3. A sustainable low carbon, equitable economy is not a new concept as it has been practiced by Africas’ Indigenous Peoples for millennia. We therefore call on African states to develop low carbon economies and move to local, national and regional economies which are sustainable, equitable and assist in environmental rehabilitation, resilience and adaptive capacities of Indigenous Peoples.

4. African Indigenous Peoples are determined to contribute by showcasing their good practices of local diverse green economies in Rio and beyond, reflecting traditional knowledge and ways of living, in order to create awareness, and inform and influence policy processes at the national, regional and international levels.

5. As our contribution to sustainable development, we will continue to define our development goals based on our cultural, social and economic knowledge, occupations, practices and technologies.

6. We are repeating our call on African governments to respect the rights of Indigenous Peoples towards Rio+ 20 and beyond, as enshrined in the Convention on Biological Diversity, Agenda 21, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and ILO Convention No. 169.

7. We further urge governments and regional organizations/financial institutions to allocate resources to enable the capacity building and the full and effective participation of Indigenous Peoples in international, regional and national processes related to the Rio conventions and other sustainable development related dialogues and processes.

On the Institutional Framework for Sustainable Development and Governance,

8. There is an urgent need in strengthening, reforming and integrating the three pillars of sustainable development, inter alia by adding culture as a fourth pillar of sustainable development.

9. We support the position of the African Governments and African Civil Society to strengthen UNEP and transform it into a specialized UN Agency. Its mandate should include the protection and promotion of the rights of the indigenous peoples of the world. In this regard, we further recommend that UNEP adopts a strong policy on Indigenous Peoples.

10. We are in support of the African consensus position on the establishment of Sustainable Development Councils at National level; but with meaningful and effective participation of indigenous peoples. We strongly recommend African States to take into consideration the Resolution on climate change and indigenous peoples adopted by the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights.

11. African states should adopt specific legal frameworks that recognize, protect and promote indigenous peoples as rights-holders, including ratification of ILO Convention No.169 on indigenous peoples.

12. In order to promote conservation of ecosystems, environmental governance in Africa must encourage the recognition of the rights of Indigenous Peoples, which includes the right to access and manage their own land and territories. As key rights holders who have been stewards of natural resources for generations, they must be integrally involved in discussions and decisions concerning their environment.

13. There is a need for the contemporary knowledge, science and technology community and the indigenous knowledge, science and technology community to develop a mutual alignment and synergy in order to feed into research, training and development as well as policy formulation.

14. We are in total support of the African Civil Society call on African Governments to accelerate the implementation of Principle 10 of the Rio 1992 Declaration by first implementing the current UNEP guidelines on this principle with a view to initiate an African Convention on Principle 10.

Done in Arusha, this Nineteenth Day of the Month of April, the Year Two Thousand and Twelve.

For more information contact; 

Mainyoito Pastoralist Integrated Development Organization (MPIDO) 

Marist Lane Off Langata Road, P.O. Box 226 – Kiserian, Kenya 

Tel/Fax: +254 20 882944/50 Cell: 254 723 561 Email: mpido@mpido.org OR soikan.meitiaki@mpido.org 

New in Africa Renewal
As Africa prepares for the Rio+20 Sustainable Development Conference, the continent’s report card shows some progress and many challenges.
28 March 2012

SPECIAL FEATURE
The future we want
To Rio and beyond: Africa seeks sustainable solutions
Special feature: Sustainable development

A compendium of Africa’s priority areas
Sustainable development priority areas show a mix of challenges and progress 

Interview with Greenpeace’s Kumi Naidoo
‘Only our collective voice will be heard’ 

Interview with Joan Clos, UN-Habitat
For sustainable cities, Africa needs planning 

How a community radio station in Kenya is changing the lives of shack dwellers
With new outlet, Korogocho residents push for reforms 

Towards a vision of African cities without slums
Governments set course towards improving poor urban areas
Also in this issue

Oil subsidy controversy in Nigeria
Government’s attempt to remove oil subsidy backfires, resulting in violent street protests 

Africa Renewal is 25 years old
A story of how the journey started 

Malian fabrics create beauty, profit
Hand-dyed fabrics win praises, capture markets 

Book Review
Africa Renewal reviews More Than Good Intentions: How a New Economics Is Helping to Solve Global Poverty by Dean Karlan and Jacob Appel 

Africa Wired
Mobile phones get smarter in rural Africa

New in Africa Renewal

As Africa prepares for the Rio+20 Sustainable Development Conference, the continent’s report card shows some progress and many challenges.

28 March 2012

SPECIAL FEATURE

The future
we want

To Rio and beyond: Africa seeks sustainable solutions

Special feature: Sustainable development

A compendium of Africa’s priority areas

Sustainable development priority areas show a mix of challenges and progress
 

Interview with Greenpeace’s Kumi Naidoo

‘Only our collective voice will be heard’
 

Interview with Joan Clos, UN-Habitat

For sustainable cities, Africa needs planning
 

How a community radio station in Kenya is changing the lives of shack dwellers

With new outlet, Korogocho residents push for reforms
 

Towards a vision of African cities without slums

Governments set course towards improving poor urban areas

Also in this issue

Oil subsidy controversy in Nigeria

Government’s attempt to remove oil subsidy backfires, resulting in violent street protests
 

Africa Renewal is 25 years old

A story of how the journey started
 

Malian fabrics create beauty, profit

Hand-dyed fabrics win praises, capture markets
 

Book Review

Africa Renewal reviews More Than Good Intentions: How a New Economics Is Helping to Solve Global Poverty by Dean Karlan and Jacob Appel
 

Africa Wired

Mobile phones get smarter in rural Africa

Columbia > Transboundary Water Management and Law in Africa

Date: Wednesday, March 7
Time: 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Location: Faculty House second floor
Organized by The Legal, Economic, Social and Environmental Issues Seminar

Jonathan Lautze, Water Advisor at USAID/International Water Management
Institute, will give a talk about transboundary water management and transboundary water law in Africa, focusing on a few case study basins.

Jonathan Lautze has been involved in a range of applied research projects focused on water governance, water security, integrated water resources management, transboundary water management, climate change and water, and water and health. He has published about 20 peer-reviewed articles in journals and books, and has lived and worked in Benin, Ethiopia, South Africa and Sri Lanka. He holds a Master of Arts in Law and Diplomacy from the Fletcher School, Tufts University and a PhD from Tufts Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Chatham House Africa Programme February Special Events Update

Angola’s External RelationsMonday 20 February 2012 17:30 to 18:30

HE Georges Rebelo Chikoti,
 Minister for External Relations, Angola
Chair: Alex Vines, Research Director, Regional and Security Studies; and Head, Africa Programme, Chatham House

The Role of Seychelles in Counter-Piracy Tuesday 21 February 2012 17:00 to 18:00

HE Jean Paul Adam, Foreign Minister, Republic of Seychelles 
HE Joel Morgan, Minister for Home Affairs, Environment, Transport and Energy, Republic of Seychelles 
Chair: Alex Vines, Research Director, Regional and Security Studies; and Head, Africa Programme, Chatham House

The Road Ahead: Somalia’s Future and International Engagement Friday 24 February 2012 17:00 to 18:00

HE Dr. Abdiweli Mohamed Ali,
 Prime Minister of Somalia


ONLY REGISTERED E-TICKET HOLDERS WITH PHOTO ID WILL BE GRANTED ACCESS

Africa Programme News and Events February 2012

RESEARCH AND PUBLICATIONS    
  Somalia’s Transition: What Role for Sub-National Entities? 
In 2011 Chatham House held a meeting of policy-makers and opinion-formers from Somalia and its diaspora to discuss the country’s transition at the end of the Transitional Federal Government’s (TFG) mandate in August 2012. This summary, in English and Somali, presents some of the issues raised in the discussion.  
   

Peace, Bread and Land: 
Agricultural Investments in Ethiopia and the Sudans

This briefing paper by Jason Mosley seeks to look beyond simplistic generalizations regarding land investments om the Horn of Africa, whilst drawing out some of the risks such investments may face for investors, local communities and governments.        

     

British Government Consultation on Somalia 
As part of the British Government’s engagement with the Somali diaspora ahead of the Government’s London Conference on Somalia, an invited audience of key thinkers and activists within the UK Somali diaspora will meet UK officials at Chatham House to discuss UK policy. The meeting is an invitation only event, however it will be broadcast live via webstreaming here from 3.00pm on the 8th February. Somalis are welcome to send questions or comments by email which may be put to UK officials on the day using the following addressquestions@chathamhouse.org. Discussion will also be taking place throughout the event on Twitter #LDNSomalia.


    EVENTS  SEE BELOW FOR TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR REGISTRATION AND ENTRY. EXPERTS AND INTERESTED INDIVIDUALS SHOULD CLICK THE LINKS BELOW AND APPLY ONLINE. PLEASE NOTE THAT REGISTRANTS WHO ARRIVE MORE THAN 10 MINUTES LATE FOR AN EVENT WILL NOT BE ADMITTED.
     West Africa and the Resource Curse  Thursday 16 February 2012     
Angola’s Minister for External Relations  Monday 20 February 2012
    Somali Diaspora in Relief, Development and Peace Building Wednesday 07 March 2012        LATEST FROM THE PROGRAMME  

Nigeria in 2012: Crises and Reforms
Speakers analysed recent events including protests and violence and considered implications for Nigeria’s prospects. 


Gender and Political Decision-making in Tanzania
A cross-party group of Tanzanian MPs discussed the challenges and changing political landscape they face in Tanzania.Read more…Read more…

The Developmental Effects of Somali Piracy
This event marked the launch of a new paper by Dr Anja Shortland, which looks at the affects of piracy on the Somali economy.
South Africa: Outcry and Protest 
This article analyses the role of the media in post-apartheid South Africa. Read more…Read more…

Columbia/Institute of African Studies Spring Event Calendar

Ifriqiyya Seminar 
Bruce Hall: The Morality of Descent: African Histories of Race in Muslim West Africa, 1600-1960

Date: Thursday, January 26, 2012
Time: 1:00pm - 3:00pm
Room: Knox Hall 208

Bruce Hall is Assistant Professor in the Department of History and the Department of African and African American Studies at Duke University. His most recent book is A History of Race in Muslim West Africa, 1600-1960, about the development of ideas surrounding racial difference along the West African Sahel.

Book discussion with Simon Gikandi: Slavery and the Culture of Taste
Date: Tuesday, January 31, 2012
Time: 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Room: Knox Hall 509

Panelists include:
Simon Gikandi (Princeton University)
Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (University of Michigan)
Saidiya Hartman (Columbia University)
Madeleine Dobie (Columbia Univeristy)
Moderated by Mamadou Diouf (Columbia University)

Simon Gikandi?s new book Slavery and the Culture of Taste (Princeton UP, 2011) demonstrates that these slavery and the culture of taste—the world of politeness, manners, and aesthetics were surprisingly entwined. Ranging across Britain, the antebellum South, and the West Indies, and examining vast archives, including portraits, period paintings, personal narratives, and diaries, Simon Gikandi illustrates how the violence and ugliness of enslavement actually shaped theories of taste, notions of beauty, and practices of high culture, and how slavery’s impurity informed and haunted the rarified customs of the time.

This event is sponsored by the Institute of African Studies, The Institute for Research in African American Studies and the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society.

University Seminar: After Antiretrovirals, During Cancer, Before Death in an African Oncology WardTalk by Julie Livingston

Date: Friday, February 3, 2012
Time: 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Location: Knox Hall 208
Seminar Chairs: Gregory Mann and Hlonipha Mokoena

IAS Film and Q&A with Dr. Grace Kodindo: Dead Mums Don’t Cry

Date: Thursday, February 9, 2012
Time: 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Location: TBD

Becoming a mother in Africa can be among the most frightening and dangerous jobs in the world.  This documentary documents the struggle of Grace Kodindo, an obstetrician in the poverty-stricken central African country of Chad, to stop mothers in her country from dying.  Cutting maternal mortality by 75% by 2015 was one of the eight Millennium Development Goals set by 189 countries in 2000. Five years on, progress is far behind schedule, but “Dead Mums Don?t Cry” shows there is reason for hope.

Dr. Kodindo, Assistant Professor of Emergency Obstetrics care at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and Medical / Advocacy Advisor to the Reproductive Health Access, Information and services in Emergency Settings (RAISE) Initiative, will be at the event to answer questions.

Elections in Africa: Senegal 2012
Date: Monday, February 13, 2012
Time: 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Room: International Affairs Building 1501

Panelists:
Mamadou Diouf (Columbia University)
Souleymane Bachir Diagne  (Columbia University)
Alioune Badara Diop (Universite Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar)
Etienne Smith (Columbia University)
Chair: Alfred Stepan  (Columbia University)

This panel discussion is part of the Institute of African Studies’ 2011-2012 series focusing on elections in Africa.  Panelists will discuss the historical context, current debates, and prospects for change in the upcoming Senegalese election.  This event is sponsored by the Institute of African Studies, the Center for the Study of Democracy, Toleration, and Religion, and the School of International and Public Affairs.

IAS Film:  African Underground: Democracy in Dakar
Date: Monday, February 13, 2012
Time: 6:30pm - 8:00pm
Location: International Affairs Building 1501

"African Underground: Democracy in Dakar" is a groundbreaking documentary film about hip-hop youth and politics in Dakar, Senegal during the controversial 2007 presidential election.  The film follows emcees, graffiti writers, and DJ’s who used their music and spray cans to educate and empower each other as a response to decades of single party political rule with little attention paid to urban poverty, unemployment, crime, and corruption.  This documentary bridges the gap between hip-hop activism, video journalism and documentary film and explores the role of youth and musical activism on the political process.

Reinventing Citizenship and Political Leadership: The Role of Civil Society and Social Movements in Consolidating Democracy in Senegal
Lecture by Professor Alioune Badara Diop
Discussant: Professor Ousmane Kane

Date: Tuesday, February 14, 2012
Time: 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Room: Knox Hall 208

Alioune Badara Diop is a Professor of Political Science at Universite Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar.  His latest book is De la Gouvernementalité du Phénix: Elections, Logiques Sociales et Démocratie Représentative au Sénégal.

Ousmane Kane has served as associate professor of international and public affairs at SIPA at Columbia University since 2002. His most recent book is The Homeland is the Arena: Religion, Transnationalism and the Integration of Senegalese Immigrants in America.

This event is sponsored by the Institute of African Studies and the Center for the Study of Democracy, Toleration, and Religion.


Ifriqqiya Seminar:

Anne Bang: Islamic Reformist Ideas in East Africa c. 1880-1940
Date: Thursday, March 1, 2012
Time: 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: Knox Hall 207

Dr. Anne Bang is Senior Researcher at the Chr. Michelsen Institute in Norway.  She is co-editor of the Indian Ocean series published by Hurst&Co (London) and of the journal Islamic Africa (NWU Press).

Charles Taylor and Liberia: Ambition and Atrocity in Africa’s Lone Star State
Book Talk with Colin Waugh

Date: Tuesday, March 20, 2012
Time: 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Location: TBD

Campaigner, insurgent, arms dealer, warlord, commodity trafficker, elected president, international fugitive and finally prisoner, Charles Taylor sought to lead his native Liberia to change but instead destroyed it in a frenzy of violence, greed and uncontrolled personal ambition. In the process he threw much of Liberia’s neighbouring region into turmoil for over a decade, finally facing judgement in The Hague for his role in the Sierra Leone conflict.  In this remarkable and eye-opening book, Colin Waugh draws on a variety of sources, testimonies and original interviews - including with Taylor himself - to recount the story of what really happened during these turbulent years. In doing so, he examines both the life of Charles Taylor, as well as the often self-interested efforts of the international community to first save Liberia from disaster, then, having failed to do so, to bring to justice the man it deems most to blame for its disintegration.

University Seminar: The King of Spices: Mapping Rights to Grains of Paradise from Chaucer to Herbal Viagra
Talk by Abena Dove Osseo-Assare (Berkeley)

Date: Friday, March 23, 2012
Time: 10:30am to 12:00pm
Location: Fayerweather Hall 411
Co-sponsored with the Center for International History

Elections in Africa: Mali 2012
Date: Tuesday, March 27, 2012
Time: 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Location: International Affairs Building 1501

Panelists include:
Susanna Wing (Haverford College)
Jaimie Bleck (University of Notre Dame)
Brandon County (Columbia University)
Moderated by Manthia Diawara (New York University)

This panel discussion is part of the Institute of African Studies’ 2011-2012 series focusing on elections in Africa.  Panelists will discuss the historical context, current debates, and prospects for change in the upcoming Malian election.  This event is sponsored by the Institute of African Studies and the School of International and Public Affairs.

IAS Film:  Bamako sigi-kan (Bamako’s pact
)
Date: Tuesday, March 27, 2011
Time: 6:30pm - 8:00pm
Location: International Affairs Building 1512

'Bamako sigi-kan” brings a new perspective to the modern African city of Bamako, exploring how democracy took root in Mali.  Filmmaker Manthia Diawara lets citizens of Bamako tell their own stories, revealing how traditions stay alive within a changing city and society.


Ifriqiyya Seminar

Beverly Mack: The 21st century ‘Yan Taru
Date: Thursday, April 5, 2012
Time: 1:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: Knox Hall 208

Beverly Mack is Professor of African Studies in the Department of African and African American Studies and the Director of the University of Kansas African Studies Center (KASC).  Her books include: One Woman’s Jihad: Nana Asma’u, Scholar and Scribe(Indiana University Press, 2001), and Muslim Women Sing: Hausa Popular Song(Indiana University Press, 2004).  

The 7th Greater New York Area Africa Historians Workshop
Date: Friday, April 13, 2012
Location: Barnard Campus
Hosted by the History Department at Barnard College

Ifriqiyya Seminar

Timothy Cleaveland: Ethnogenesis in the Sahara, using Arabic sources
Date: Thursday, May 1, 2012
Time: 1:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: Knox Hall 208

Timothy Cleaveland is Associate Professor of History at the University of Georgia.  His latest book is Becoming Walata: A History of Saharan Social Formation and Transformation.

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR Powering Sustainable Energy for All By BAN KI-MOON Published: January 11, 2012

As a child growing up during the Korean War, I studied by candlelight. Electric conveniences such as refrigerators and fans were largely unknown. Yet within my lifetime, that reality changed utterly. Easy access to energy opened abundant new possibilities for my family and my nation. […]

Africa Programme News and Events January 2012


   RESEARCH AND PUBLICATIONS    

Elections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo: Local Matters
Africa Programme Paper, November 2011
Ben Shepherd

Read more…
 EVENTS  SEE BELOW FOR TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR REGISTRATION AND ENTRY. EXPERTS AND INTERESTED INDIVIDUALS SHOULD CLICK THE LINKS BELOW AND APPLY ONLINE. PLEASE NOTE THAT REGISTRANTS WHO ARRIVE MORE THAN 10 MINUTES LATE FOR AN EVENT WILL NOT BE ADMITTED.
    
The Developmental Effects of Somali Piracy Thursday 12 January 2012
    LATEST FROM THE PROGRAMME  

Niger’s Regional Policy and Influence
HE Mohamed Bazoum, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Niger discussed the growing threats facing Niger from terrorism and crime.
Growing Instability in the Western Sahel
At this meeting the participants shared their insights on the current political and security situation and the transnational challenges facing the region.Read more…Read more…

Food Crisis in West Africa: Action Needed
Expert comment by Rob Bailey, Senior Research Fellow, Environment and Development Programme.
Angola Forum Twitter 
You can now follow the Angola Forum at Chatham House on Twitter: @AngolaForumRead more…

World Sustainable Energy Conference Launching the World Sustainable Energy Year 2012

Energy Recommendations for Rio+20

Tuesday 10th – Thursday 12th January 2012 at ILO in Geneva

Objectives:
Present and discuss all sustainable energy solutions and their implementation tools by energy type, quantity, annual investment and cost from now ’til 2050 and beyond. Show the positive impacts of sustainable energies on economies, jobs and health. Provide energy information input to the United Nations Rio+20 Anniversary Summit.

Participants:
Government and United Nations officials involved in energy and environment, industry delegates, academia and relevant NGO representatives.

Scope:

Pleas of Representatives of the United Nations Organizations:
ILO, WMO, WHO, WTO, UNESCO, UNITAR, HABITAT, UNEP & FI, UNDP, UNIDO, ECE, UNCTAD

IGO & NGO Pleas: IUCN, ISEO, IRENA, IEA, WWF, GREENPEACE, GREENCROSS, CMDC, FOE, FEDRE, ICLEI, ISES, IGA, IHA, WWEA, WHA, GENI, …

Technologies: Solar, Hydro, Wind, Geo & Ocean Thermal, Bio Energy, Novel Energy Technologies

Academia: MIT, ETH, Tokyo University, Tsinghua, TU Munich, TU Vienna, Imperial College, Pace

Policy and Legislation: Global Energy Charter of Sustainable Development, National Energy Laws

Country Success Stories: Germany, USA, China, India, Austria, Norway, Iceland, Brazil, ….

City Success Stories: Geneva, Munich, London, Beijing, Rio, Osaka, Zurich, Graz, New York, …..

Role of Standardization: International Standards Organizations ISO, IEC, ITU

Financing: Public-Private Partnerships, World Bank / IFC, Small Credits, Sustainability Funds, …..

Impact on Health: WHO mitigation initiatives, health statistics, prophylaxis to avoid diseases

Impact on the Labour Market: Cooperation between ILO, other UN bodies and the NGO sector

In the morning plenary sessions problems and solutions are presented by experts

In the afternoons interactive working groups elaborate, conclude and recommend feasible clean, sustainable energy solutions.

Conclusions and recommendations are formulated as input to the Rio+20 Summit.

See enclosed Energy and Labour forecast tables to be completed before and during the conference.

Venue:
ILO, 4 route des Morillons, CH-1211 Genève 22, Switzerland
Tel:             +41 (0) 22 799 6111       – Fax: +41 (0) 22 798 8685 – E-mail: ilo@ilo.org